Archives: ekyaaglzf

Fleming set to pounce as law firms open up

September 4, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: ekyaaglzf.

first_imgWednesday 15 September 2010 8:08 pm Tags: NULL KCS-content whatsapp whatsapp More From Our Partners A ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comBill Gates reportedly hoped Jeffrey Epstein would help him win a Nobelnypost.comWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.com FLEMING Family & Partners, the private wealth manager, has joined the growing pool of firms interested in investing into the legal sector once the market opens up next autumn. Show Comments ▼ Fleming set to pounce as law firms open up The family arm, which manages personal wealth for high net-worth families, has recently been in discussion with a number of law firms in the City about becoming a potential third party investor, say sources close to the talks. It can only do so after October next year once the government brings the Legal Services Act (LSA) into force.Flemings joins a growing number of bodies, including a raft of private equity firms, which could inject capital into law firms in the future. Other potential parties include Lyceum Capital, Phoenix Equity Partners, Lloyds Development Capital and Investec.A growing number of family offices, similar to Flemings, are becoming increasingly interested in investing in the legal sector with hopes that their returns will be substantial.Flemings declined to comment on any potential investment into law firms.The LSA, which received Royal Assent three years ago, is likely to radically change the landscape of the legal sector. The act is expected to open the traditionally closed partnership model to external investors and will enable law firms to have the ability to raise additional finance through an initial public offering.A number of legal bodies are already considering their options and whether or not to float on the stock market once the act comes into force.It will also open the door to non-legal entities, including banks, real estate agents and insurers to join forces with legal outfits to create an alternative and broader business structure. Share by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastNoteabley25 Funny Notes Written By StrangersNoteableyMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBemoneycougar.comThis Proves The Osmonds Weren’t So Innocentmoneycougar.comElite HeraldExperts Discover Girl Born From Two Different SpeciesElite Heraldautooverload.comDeclassified Vietnam War Photos The Public Wasn’t Meant To Seeautooverload.comlast_img read more

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AXA Real Estate raises €1.26bn from investors

September 4, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: ekyaaglzf.

first_img AXA Real Estate Investment Managers raised €1.26bn (£1.1bn) in the first quarter of 2011, with €800m raised as segregated accounts to reflect an ongoing demand for diversified mandates. Axa Real Estate, the largest real estate manager in Europe with €39.9bn in assets under management, also raised €460m for two of its pan-European institutional investment vehicles, and for a debt fund it launched in January this year.Kiran Patel, global head of business development, distribution, research and strategy said: “The fact that we have seen such strong interest from investors in both our debt and development funds in particular, reflects the increasing appetite since the start of this year for funds with strategies across the entire risk spectrum.” whatsapp Tags: NULL AXA Real Estate raises €1.26bn from investors Share whatsappcenter_img Read This Next’A Quiet Place Part II’ Sets Pandemic Record in Debut WeekendFamily ProofHiking Gadgets: Amazon Deals Perfect For Your Next AdventureFamily ProofAmazon roars for MGM’s lion, paying $8.45 billion for studio behind JamesFamily ProofBack on the Rails for Summer New York to New Orleans, Savannah and MiamiFamily ProofIndian Spiced Vegetable Nuggets: Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofYoga for Beginners: 3 Different Types of Yoga You Should TryFamily ProofChicken Bao: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofCheese Crostini: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofHomemade Tomato Soup: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily Proof Monday 25 April 2011 10:38 pm Show Comments ▼ KCS-content by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesMoneyPailShe Was An Actress, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailLuxury SUVs | Search AdsThese Cars Are So Loaded It’s Hard to Believe They’re So CheapLuxury SUVs | Search AdsDrivepedia20 Of The Most Underrated Vintage CarsDrivepediaMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryBetterBeDrones Capture Images No One Was Suppose to SeeBetterBeZen HeraldThe Truth About Why ’40s Actor John Wayne Didn’t Serve In WWII Has Come To LightZen Heraldautooverload.comDeclassified Vietnam War Photos The Public Wasn’t Meant To Seeautooverload.comlast_img read more

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Kenya Commercial Bank (KCB.rw) 2016 Annual Report

July 12, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: ekyaaglzf.

first_imgKenya Commercial Bank (KCB.rw) listed on the Rwanda Stock Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2016 annual report.For more information about Kenya Commercial Bank (KCB.rw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Kenya Commercial Bank (KCB.rw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Kenya Commercial Bank (KCB.rw)  2016 annual report.Company ProfileKenya Commercial Bank (KCB) Rwanda Limited is a commercial bank offering financial solutions to private individuals and the corporate banking segment in Rwanda. KCB Bank Rwanda is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the KCB Group which is East Africa’s largest commercial bank by asset base. The Bank was established in 2008 after it was licensed by Rwanda’s banking regulator, the National Bank of Rwanda. It has 14 branches located in the main towns and cities of Rwanda as well as an extensive network of KCB Iwacu agents. Kenya Commercial Bank is listed on the Rwanda Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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With its dividend yield now at 14.9%, I’d consider buying this share

July 5, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: ekyaaglzf.

first_img “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Manika Premsingh | Saturday, 29th February, 2020 | More on: RMG Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. With its dividend yield now at 14.9%, I’d consider buying this share  Manika Premsingh has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this.center_img I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. See all posts by Manika Premsingh Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Image source: Getty Images. Enter Your Email Address When I wrote about the FTSE 250 mail and parcel delivery company Royal Mail Group (LSE: RMG) earlier this month, its share price had fallen sharply. It fell even more this week, as investors’ growing diffidence with RMG was further reinforced by the overall market dip. The FTSE 100 closed below 7,000 yesterday, levels that haven’t been seen in over a year. High dividend yield  RMG hasn’t been one for the growth investor for the last couple of years. Its share price has been falling fast after hitting a peak in early 2018. Conversely, its dividend yield has become increasingly impressive. It stands at 14.9% now. 5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…This is the highest yield on offer among all FTSE 250 companies, save Tullow Oil, whose yield is at 16.9%. In fact, it compares favourably even to FTSE 100 shares, which on average have a higher yield than FTSE 250 shares. RMG’s dividend yield is lower than only that of the mining company EVRAZ, which has a 17.3% yield right now.  This is great news for investors in RMG, provided the group can maintain its dividends. There is some danger of declining dividends considering that its financials are on shaky grounds. But the company is taking steps to fend off the possibility of a loss in the future. One of these is an increase in stamp prices. It has also proposed a pay deal to its workers’ union, which it estimates is an increase of 16% from 2018 to 2023.    On shaky grounds How far this will help RMG remains to be seen. The union is still clearly dissatisfied. It’s now going to vote on whether to strike or not. Late last year, management was able to stop the strike through court intervention. But the same challenge has reared its head again, suggesting that the dispute between the RMG management and its workers is still very much alive.  This is at a time when Royal Mail is undergoing a shift in its business. The letters’ business is on its way out. It expects a 75% drop in letter volumes between 2004 and 2024 and is transitioning more into its parcel business. Its future now depends on how successfully it makes the change, for which it has a plan in place for up to 2024. In its last financial update, it expressed concerns about being able to meet its turnaround plan targets. One of the reasons cited for this is uncertain economic conditions, which might or might not change in the near future.  For the income investor, this means that there is a risk to passive income from RMG. At the same time, the dividend yield is impressive and a calculated risk can pay off well. I would take heart from the fact that the company’s CEO, Rico Back, bought shares in early February; which can be a good sign for its prospects. I am definitely considering buying RMG, but I’ll wait to see the outcome of the current dispute with workers is handled.  last_img read more

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Wallaby legend Michael Lynagh sees only the positives of life after his stroke

June 23, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: ekyaaglzf.

first_imgAustralia great Michael Lynagh, a World Cup winner in 1991, talks golf handicaps, jumping at shadows and medical miracles with Rugby World Model pro: at Saracens, Lynagh would visit away grounds before matches to get used to the pitch (Getty)I didn’t have anything, except for my eyes. They can’t explain it. I put it down to pure luck. And at the second stage when they started to do the dehydrating, I see that as the time when being relatively fit and healthy, and pretty dogged and determined, that’s where they kicked in. The fact that I wasn’t hit too bad, that’s just luck because the doctors can’t explain it.RW: You were left with impaired vision that hasn’t changed to this day. Yet you’re on the way to repassing your driving test?ML: Yes, I’ve passed the physical and mental tests and can legally drive, though I’m still awaiting the medical ratification. It’s a matter of scanning, and hearing becomes quite interesting. So having the window down is helpful. But bikes, pedestrians don’t make a lot of noise. Also, being aware of what’s behind you, what’s around you, just taking it pretty easy is the key. They say that after about five years following an event like this you’re normally alright to drive again, you’ve adjusted enough. But this has been three and a half.RW: So that’s the expectation, you just adjust mentally?ML: Yeah, if I look here I can’t see you but (turns head) if I look here I can, so it’s not a big thing. Literally I can’t see you now. There’s no physical difference in vision but you compensate for it. And sometimes my physio, when treating old injuries, he thinks my neck clicks are because I’m turning a bit to the left a lot of the time.So it’s about compensation and I think it’s in the book about train stations and tube stations, when it’s random events and people are coming from different angles, that’s difficult. Walking along Oxford Street, most people are coming towards you but then there are people who come out of shops…Pass go: the Queenslander moves the ball during Australia’s RWC 1991 semi-final win v New ZealandRW: Do you have to walk slower?ML: No, I’m a quick walker. I guess my evasive skills were always pretty good and they’ve come into play with all this. I might see a shadow on the ground and I’ll jump. Sometimes I react and there’s nothing there. Or there’s someone coming and I get a fright because I haven’t seen it. And people look at you and go “Alright?” If I walk with somebody I’ll put them on my left.At my desk (at a commercial property investment group), sometimes people come and stand beside me and I don’t know they’re there. I get a feeling and then turn. They forget as well.RW: Is it a good thing that people forget you’ve had a stroke, because it means you’re treated just like everyone else?ML: Oh yes, I don’t want to be treated any differently. There was one job that I went for – I don’t know if it’s in the book. I was the only candidate left, and I was meeting other board members, and as soon as I’d mentioned that I’d had a stroke, it was “What? When? How?” Funnily enough I didn’t get the job. I’m sure it was because of that. I was a ‘health risk’.RW: How different is your life now?ML: Not that different. I said to Isabella, “If I’m sleeping leave me alone, there are days when I’m going to need afternoon naps on the couch.” She said, “So it’s no different to normal then?” But I did sleep a lot anyway. My rule is still that if I’m tired I have a sleep. I have sat in meetings when I first came back (to work), at about three or four o’clock, and it was hard, so you deal with that by scheduling meetings in the morning.RW: I know you love golf. How that’s going?ML: I almost gave it up. It was terribly difficult because I played off seven or eight, and I loved playing. And I came out and… (despairing shrug) I didn’t play for a year and a bit, apart from having a bit of a putt. Putts this long I was missing this far to the right, every one. So okay, aim a bit more to the left. And then I hit it left instead of straight.Master’s voice: Lynagh is an analyst for Sky TV and part of ITV’s team for the 2015 World Cup (Inpho)I remember playing one game and I just said, “This is too frustrating.” It really was because you knew what you were capable of doing, and then you weren’t capable of playing at all.I couldn’t hit the ball very well, everything’s changed. I came home and said, ‘That’s it, I’m not going to play any more.” And Isabella said, “No, no, just see it as another hurdle that you have to get over. Just be glad you’re out there. You’ve got beautiful courses to play on, you’ve got great friends that don’t mind if you don’t play as well; in fact, they’ll probably take more money off you because of it!”So I started to change my attitude, and I realised that it’s just nice to be out there. My handicap went up to 16, it’s now back down to 12. I played the other week and on one nine I shot one under par.In the swing: driving off the second tee at St Andrews, watched by Kenny Dalglish, in 2001 (Getty Images)RW: One under on the outward nine?!ML: Yeah! But that was the best I’ve played since before the stroke. The back nine wasn’t great but I still played to single figures, which was great. My putting had been a real issue; I’d three or four putt from ten feet. My depth perception wasn’t great, I worked that out along the road too. You know how you get bumps along the footpath? I was tripping up because my depth perception has obviously been affected a little bit. So you have to deal with that. Over time I think my brain’s compensated and worked it out.RW: So can this ‘compensation’ take you back to a handicap of seven again?ML: Possibly, yes. I’ve got some bad habits now because when it happened it made me try and change things to compensate. But I play reasonably enough to be competitive. I’m at the stage where I could hit 100 one day, 80 the next. I’m not very consistent but I’m not the only bloke in the world who’s like that. Some of my friends say it’s got nothing to do with your sight, it’s called age! They could be right. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Gold standard: Lynagh at the 1987 World Cup. He sits eighth in the all-time points list (Pic: Getty Images) center_img Wallaby legend Michael Lynagh sees only the positives of life after his strokeSometimes one autobiography just isn’t enough. Twenty years after publishing a best seller shortly before his international retirement, Michael Lynagh has released a searing read, Blindsided, to cover the stroke that almost took his life in April 2012.Lynagh’s insights into the stressful existence of a goalkicker – he is still Australia’s record scorer, with 911 – are some of the most searchingly honest views ever published on the subject. However, taking centre stage in his book is his stroke, an often-fatal condition that occurs when the blood supply to the brain is cut off.Lynagh describes it as like being hit on the back of the head by a baseball bat, and the story of how this legendary fly-half and 1991 World Cup winner fought back from the brink whilst lying in intensive care in a Brisbane hospital – contemplating whether he had the strength to continue living – is one that will grip any reader.Rugby World caught up with Lynagh to find out more…Recognition: Lynagh and family during the World Rugby Hall of Fame awards in 2014 (World Rugby)Rugby World: Michael, this is a powerful book…Michael Lynagh: Yes, when I saw the first draft I thought ‘Jeez, that’s a bit dramatic’. But Mark (Eglinton, the ghostwriter) said, “That’s what you told me and it is dramatic. Don’t play it down.” I’m sure there will people saying it’s embellished but when you see the snippets from my wife (Isabella), my dad, doctors, other people… I found all those comments really interesting because I hadn’t heard them before, how people reacted and thought about it.RW: You say you had dizzy turns in advance of your stroke. Were they significant?ML: In hindsight they were probably warning signals. They were like the bed spins you get when you’ve had too much to drink, but they would go away very quickly. I probably should have gone to the doctor but when I mentioned it to him (later), he said the event that went bang was nothing to do with it really.RW: What is your take on why the stroke happened?ML: I was flying to Singapore for a speaking engagement but fell asleep at Dubai and missed the connecting flight. Missing the flight was stressful and then I sat in the airport for 12 hours waiting for the next flight. I literally went from Singapore airport to the golf course, playing in 100% humidity and 30-degree heat. Then I was out that night.Home-team hero: Lynagh was a Super Ten champion with Queensland in 1994 (Getty)The next day I had another golf game in the heat and that evening was out again. The next day I had the dinner, and then I found out that as soon as you miss a flight your bookings are all gone, so I was supposed to fly to Brisbane the next day but didn’t have a flight. I was in the hotel trying to sort it out until four in the morning, after speaking at a dinner, which I find pretty stressful anyway.Finally, I got a flight the next day. I was tired and dehydrated, and got off the plane to play golf again, in 30-degree heat again, and having barely slept for four days. While all this might not sound stressful, everything I did was a contributing factor – sleep deprivation, jetlag, dehydration, vigorously swinging a golf club.Then I went and had a couple of beers that night and bang.RW: So it was a cumulative effect but with a final catalyst?ML: It was like the perfect storm of everything coming together and had I not laughed at a joke as the beer went down and choked, nothing would have happened. It needed an event to cause the stroke, and that was the choking. (Lynagh suffered a split vertebral artery, causing a blood clot.)RW: In hospital, they decided not to operate but instead dehydrate you (through drugs) to reduce the swelling…ML: Yes, it wasn’t very comfortable. They woke me every half an hour, for a day and a half, because one of the signs that things are getting worse is that you start to get in a lot of pain but also you lose your speech.I’d be getting off to sleep, then they’d wake me and ask, “What day is it? Who’s the prime minister of Australia? Where are you?” I couldn’t remember the intensive care unit, the ICU. I said, “I know where I am, it’s where really sick people go, I just can’t recall the name!” I couldn’t really remember the days but knew it was somewhere between my son’s birthdayKnockout blow: scoring the late try that beat Ireland in the 1991 World Cup quarter-final (Inpho)and my sister’s birthday. They’d also check to see if I still had strength in both hands, and make me lift my legs. After a while they’d wake me up and I’d go, “Julia Gillard, 14th April, give me your hands and I’ll squeeze them.” I’m glad they didn’t ask me the prime minister question this week, we’re on our fifth in five years!If things had started to get worse, I was ready to be operated on immediately. The operation is a big one, and you’re sitting there and you can’t see and you’ve got this terrible head, you know it’s pretty grave, then they tell you what this operation entails and you think, ‘Jesus, this is serious. This is proper “may not wake up from this” sort of stuff.’ But I was ready.Then they sat at the end of the bed and said, “We’re not going to do it. You’re functioning too well. We don’t know how but you are, and we would never forgive ourselves if we did the operation and something happened. So we’re going to go this way first.” And that became three days of hell (with the dehydration process).RW: Did being a fit, former professional sportsman help you beat the odds?ML: No, I think I was just lucky. Because it hits and that’s it. Neurologists talk about being like electricians but they say they can’t fix the wiring in your head. And it depends what wiring gets touched. In the book there’s a picture of the area of stroke on the brain scan. Normally with that size everything gets hit – walking, hands, speech, everything. Blindsided, by Michael Lynagh, is published by HarperCollins, RRP £20.last_img read more

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RSF refers Jamal Khashoggi’s disappearance to UN Working Group

June 12, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: ekyaaglzf.

first_img June 3, 2021 Find out more October 10, 2018 – Updated on October 17, 2018 RSF refers Jamal Khashoggi’s disappearance to UN Working Group News RSF_en Organisation News Reporters Without Borders (RSF) and two other human rights groups, Al Karama and ALQST, have jointly referred the case of the missing dissident Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi to the United Nations Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances.  Between 25 and 30 professional and non-professional journalists are currently detained in Saudi Arabia, which is ranked 169th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2018 World Press Freedom Index. to go further  Khashoggi’s disappearance has come amid an intense crackdown on critics of the Saudi government in which more than 15 journalists and bloggers have been arrested in a completely opaque manner in Saudi Arabia since last September.  WhatsApp blocks accounts of at least seven Gaza Strip journalists June 8, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts News Follow the news on Middle East – North Africa News RSF joins Middle East and North Africa coalition to combat digital surveillance Protestors hold pictures of missing journalist Jamal Khashoggi during a demonstration in front of the Saudi Arabian consulate, on October 5, 2018 in Istanbul. June 9, 2021 Find out more  RSF suggests that the investigation could be carried out by David Kaye, the UN special rapporteur on freedom of expression and opinion, Agnès Callamard, the UN special rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions and by the UN Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances. Saudi ArabiaMiddle East – North Africa TurkeyEurope – Central Asia Protecting journalists DisappearancesFreedom of expressionUnited Nations Saudi ArabiaMiddle East – North Africa TurkeyEurope – Central Asia Protecting journalists DisappearancesFreedom of expressionUnited Nations Iran: Press freedom violations recounted in real time January 2020 Help by sharing this information RSF is also calling for an independent international investigation to determine what happened to Khashoggi, a well-known newspaper columnist living in self-imposed exile in the United States who has not been seen since he went to the Saudi consulate in Istanbul a week ago.last_img read more

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UTPB Philharmonic to perform Sunday

June 2, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: ekyaaglzf.

first_imgUTPB Philharmonic. Local NewsEducation Pinterest Facebook UTPB Philharmonic to perform Sunday WhatsApp Twitter utpb logo words OR USE THIS ONE Thomas Hohstadt, former conductor of the Midland Odessa Symphony, will present a concert with the UTPB Philharmonic Orchestra at 4 p.m. Sunday in the main hall of the Wagner Noël Performing Arts Center, 1310 N. Farm to Market Road 1788.Featured soloist will be pianist Shari Santorelli performing the Grieg Piano Concerto. The Philharmonic will be featured, as well, in the orchestral favorite “New World Symphony.”The university is offering this concert free to the public.More Informationcenter_img By admin – April 5, 2018 Pinterest Facebook WhatsApp Twitter Previous articlePet vaccination clinicNext articleCity Pipe expands amid soaring pipeline demand adminlast_img read more

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AP PHOTOS: Sistine Chapel key-keeper opens up after lockdown

June 2, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: ekyaaglzf.

first_img Pinterest Facebook By Digital AIM Web Support – February 7, 2021 Gianni Crea, the Vatican Museums chief “Clavigero” key-keeper, opens the door of the 16th century “Pio Clementino” section, the museum’s oldest one, at the Vatican, Monday, Feb. 1, 2021. Crea is the “clavigero” of the Vatican Museums, the chief key-keeper whose job begins each morning at 5 a.m., opening the doors and turning on the lights through 7 kilometers of one of the world’s greatest collections of art and antiquities. The Associated Press followed Crea on his rounds the first day the museum reopened to the public, joining him in the underground “bunker” where the 2,797 keys to the Vatican treasures are kept in wall safes overnight. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini) VATICAN CITY (AP) — The Sistine Chapel reopened to public view last week for the first time since its November coronavirus closure, but for Gianni Crea, the doors to Michelangelo’s magnificent frescoes were never really closed. Crea is the “clavigero” of the Vatican Museums, the chief key-keeper whose job begins each morning at 5 a.m., opening the doors and turning on the lights through 7 kilometers (4 1/2 miles) of one of the world’s greatest collections of art and antiquities. The Associated Press followed Crea on his rounds the first day the museum reopened to the public, joining him before dawn in the downstairs “bunker” where the 2,797 keys to the Vatican treasures are kept in wall safes overnight. As the keys dangled and jangled from giant keyrings he wears around his wrist, Crea wound his way through the Gallery of Maps, past the famed marble “Laocoön and His Sons” statue and finally to the Sistine Chapel. There, at a tiny wooden doorway, Crea drew out a white envelope from his suit pocket, ripped it open and pulled out a small silvery-brass key. Using a small flashlight to guide his way, he slipped the key into the keyhole, turned it gently and creaked open the door to reveal the still-darkened chapel where popes are made during the secret ceremonies that draw their very name — “conclave” — from the crucial role that keys play in them. Cardinals are essentially locked away “with a key” in the Sistine Chapel and the nearby Vatican hotel for the duration of the solemn vote to elect a new pope. As a result, the Sistine Chapel key is of particular importance and is handled with its own protocol: After the room is shuttered for the day when the last visitor leaves, the key is put back in a new white envelope, sealed, stamped and replaced in the bunker wall safe, with its comings and goings duly noted in a thick registry book. Crea recalls fondly the day that, three years into his now-23 years of service, he was finally allowed to open the door to the Sistine Chapel alone. The privilege in the two decades since has given him a chance to visit Michelangelo’s “Last Temptation” and scenes of the New Testament and Old all alone, in the empty quiet of dawn. “All the statues, all the rooms have a unique history, but naturally the Sistine Chapel always gives you a particularly emotion,” Crea said. Even though the public was shut out of the Vatican Museums for 88 days, Crea and his team of 10 key-keepers kept up their routine of opening and closing doors, since the exhibition rooms had to be cleaned, dusted and maintained by a small army of museum workers. Restorers took the opportunity to do maintenance work that would otherwise be impossible when the nearly 7 million annual visitors pass through the museums during a normal year. But 2020 was anything but normal. Only around 1.3 million visitors came, arranging visits around Italy’s two COVID-19 lockdowns. Now, to maintain social-distancing protocols, up to 400 people can be admitted every 30 minutes, with timed tickets purchased in advance online. Crea, who confesses that he sometimes misplaces his own house keys, will make sure the doors are open for them. “It is a unique emotion, an incredible privilege for me and my colleagues to have the possibility of showing these extraordinary art works, that are part of our history, to visitors from all over the world,” he said. ——— Nicole Winfield contributed. ——— Follow AP’s pandemic coverage at https://apnews.com/coronavirus-pandemic. Previous articleProtect your heart with a quick scanORMC, MCH offer heart health checkupsNext articleELAM: Moving and working Digital AIM Web Support WhatsApp WhatsApp TAGS  center_img Twitter AP PHOTOS: Sistine Chapel key-keeper opens up after lockdown Twitter Pinterest Local NewsWorld News Facebooklast_img read more

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SingleStore Announces Connected Data Group as New Value-Added Reseller

June 2, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: ekyaaglzf.

first_img SingleStore Announces Connected Data Group as New Value-Added Reseller Facebook Facebook Local NewsBusiness Pinterest By Digital AIM Web Support – February 9, 2021 WhatsApp Twitter Pinterest Twitter TAGS  WhatsApp Previous articleAlight’s digital employee events platform provides rich, expansive user experience and optimizes engagementNext articleMarqeta Names Global Banking Leader Martha Cummings to its Board of Directors Digital AIM Web Supportlast_img read more

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Strabane SDLP Councillor condemns gun and explosive findings in the town

May 27, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: ekyaaglzf.

first_img Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR By News Highland – September 8, 2013 Strabane SDLP Councillor condemns gun and explosive findings in the town News Google+ Twitter WhatsApp Pinterestcenter_img Pinterest An SDLP councillor has condemned the latest incidents that took place in Strabane over the weekend.Yesterday a gun was found in a hedge in the Ballycolman housing estate, leading to a number of houses being evacuated. Then this morning police were called to Cemetery road, where suspected explosives and bomb making material were found. Army technical officers were called to the scene however no houses were evacuated.Local councillor Patsy Kelly has voiced his concern over the findings, stating it was lucky no children picked up the gun thinking it was a toy. He called for anyone with information to come forward and contact the police…[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/pat6.mp3[/podcast] Previous articlePolice find suspected explosives in StrabaneNext articleUpdate – More tests on West Donegal man critically ill after UK crash News Highland 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic WhatsApp 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Facebook Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire Twitter Google+last_img read more

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