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Fulham ‘to increase offer’ for Huddersfield striker Rhodes

December 21, 2019 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: zuwcxmlkn.

first_imgFulham are to increase their bid for Huddersfield striker Jordan Rhodes to £5m, according to The People.It was claimed last week that Fulham had an offer of £3.5m for the Terriers star rejected.The People also say that QPR are close to signing Fulham’s out-of-contract forward Andy Johnson and that the Whites have clinched the signings of highly-rated Portuguese teenagers Filipie Cristo and Dinei from Setubal.Meanwhile,  a number of newspapers report comments made by USA boss Jurgen Klinsmann, who suggests American star Clint Dempsey should leave Craven Cottage.Klinsmann is quoted as saying: “If you play consistently at the highest level then offers will come in. I think everybody is aware of that. His goal is the right goal, – we have often discussed it.“If he has the opportunity to go to a Champions League team, that’s the crème de la crème of club soccer then you have to do that, with all the respect obviously to Fulham, as he often mentions.“But you want to play in the biggest club competition in the world and that’s the European Champions League and hopefully something will happen over the next couple of weeks.“If it doesn’t happen then he has to keep pounding away and knocking at the door.”Follow West London Sport on Twitter Find us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Using 3D Printing to Repair Rodin’s Thinker

December 16, 2019 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: zuwmcftfp.

first_img9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… curt hopkins Related Posts 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnoutcenter_img Following up their creation of an exact replica of King Tut’s mummy, Belgian company iMaterialise has helped to repair Rodin’s famous sculpture The Thinker. In 2007, the Singer Laren Museum in the Netherlands, where The Thinker resided, was burglarized. The meatheads who broke in did so not to steal the art, but to steal the metal. They made off with seven sculptures and started to try to chop them up to sell for scrap. Six of the sculptures were utterly destroyed but a badly damaged Thinker was recovered. Quite aside from its artistic merit, it is worth, on the open market, up to $10 million. So the Singer Laren needed to figure out how to deal with the butchered figure. iMaterialise had an idea. They did a CT scan of the damaged figure. Then they scanned the original mold retained by the Musee Rodin in Paris. They printed out a full-sized copy from the original on their Mammoth 3D printer. The Mammoth uses a photopolymer resin to form the product in sections about six feet in length. The CT scans are imported and rendered using Materialise’s software. Lasers guide the shape, laying down thin sheets until they build up into the figure. A modeler finishes, adding texture and color.The conservators at the Singer Laren have used that and the scans of the original to re-fabricate and lay in the missing and damaged parts of the statue. The remade Thinker is on display at an exhibit at the Singer Laren called The Thinker Thinks Again through May. First photo copyright by Kees Haageman | second photo copyright by Paul Kramer 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People… Tags:#art#web last_img read more

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Physically disadvantaged Bangalore children find freedom in a city swimming pool

November 28, 2019 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: zzqgqddue.

first_imgEleven-year-old Thomas was mortally afraid of water. Not unusual for children of his age. Then one fine morning at the Bangalore City Corporation pool, he fought his fear-and won. As he splashed about, it was obvious that this was a big accomplishment. Bigger still because Thomas has cerebral palsy. And,Eleven-year-old Thomas was mortally afraid of water. Not unusual for children of his age. Then one fine morning at the Bangalore City Corporation pool, he fought his fear-and won. As he splashed about, it was obvious that this was a big accomplishment. Bigger still because Thomas has cerebral palsy. And because he was accompanied by 44 children, who like him, are physically or mentally disadvantaged.Some suffer from cerebral palsy, a condition marked by weakness and impaired coordination of the limbs caused by damage to the brain before or during birth. Others have Down’s Syndrome, a congenital disorder due to a chromosome defect and characterised by diminished intelligence and physical abnormalities.But watching them in the pool, you wouldn’t know that. With every successful stroke, their sense of integration with the mainstream seems more complete, the smiles on their drenched faces fuller.In their midst is coach Raju Pujari, a product of the National Institute of Sports, Patiala. He looks at the splashing youngsters with pride, recalling how he first saw them a year ago at Sri Sajjan Rao Vidya Samsthe (SSRVS), a school for children with special needs. The sight tugged at his heart and he imagined taking them under his wing. That’s what he actually did, training them with the support of the neighbouring Basavanagudi Aquatic Centre (BAC), where he works.HOPE FLOATS: Pujari helps the children to improve their motor coordinationDevising a course suited for these 45 children was not easy. “In the beginning, we were not sure how to go about training these children,” says Pujari. “We had to slowly work on them and fight their fear of water.” But painstaking efforts by Pujari, other coaches and a host of volunteers eventually paid off.”Children who had no clue about hand and eye coordination began to show a marked improvement after being put into water,” says K. Shashikala, a teacher at SSRVS who has been trained to impart special education. A good example is that of 14-year-old Swathi Srinath who has Down’s Syndrome. Attending the intensive two-month programme at the centre seems to have done her wonders. Her father believes Swathi looks much more confident now.She’s not the only one. Rekha could not walk properly, but in the pool she splashes about happily. Pawan, who has cerebral palsy, is confined to a wheelchair, but he undergoes a transformation in the water, as does Raju, who swims with the inflatable tube that keeps him afloat. Says Pawan’s mother: “We wish we had done this earlier. His stiff limbs have loosened.”That’s not an exaggeration. Studies have proved the benefits of swimming for the mentally and physically challenged. Water is believed to relax the muscles while lending firm support to the body weight. There are neurological advantages as well, because sensation is more pronounced in water.The coaches follow exercises that are designed to enhance the range of motion and coordination, besides lung capacity, breath control and overall strength. As a result, children with cerebral palsy or other problems have greater freedom of movement in water than anywhere else.Prabhavati Chandra, whose 12-year old daughter with Down’s Syndrome has made considerable progress at the pool, is even striving for perfection. Though her daughter swims very well, her left arm does not have the same extension, amplitude, speed or power as her right arm, she feels. As a result, her strokes are a bit uneven, but she’s convinced that practice will correct this.Pujari is equally confident. “There is no handicap at all as far as I can see,” he says. “What these kids lacked was opportunity.” While showing them the way, the BAC has been especially sensitive to their special needs-that children with cerebral palsy and Down’s Syndrome are slow learners. Since flippers have proved beneficial abroad, BAC hopes to acquire some to help the children improve their speed and posture. That would allow them to focus better on their strokes.While self-enhancement and integration are the final goals, the coaches at the centre believe that they can be achieved only through patience and perseverance. That’s instilled in the minds of the students and their parents right at the outset. As Pujari points out, it’s one step at a time. Or perhaps a stroke in the right direction.advertisementlast_img read more

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BAHAMAS Environmental Health Hosted Expert Mission Towards Mosquito Control

September 17, 2019 | By admin | Comments Off on BAHAMAS Environmental Health Hosted Expert Mission Towards Mosquito Control | Filed in: ercinbyyl.

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, February 22, 2018 – Nassau – The Department of Environmental Health in conjunction with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) hosted an Expert Mission recently towards The Bahamas’ implementing the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), an old technique that is safe and cost effective in the integrated vector (mosquito) control programme.SIT has been successfully applied as an agricultural control tool to various insect species including med flies, codling moth Cydia pomonella (L.), onion maggot Delia antiqua (Meigen) and some species of tsetse flies Glossina spp as means of sustaining crops, decreasing financial inputs and increasing economic benefits.Most recently this technology has transitioned to the area of mosquito control.  SIT is thought to be an effective mechanism in mitigating the transmission of vector borne diseases such as Dengue Fever, Chickungunya and most recently the ZIKA virus known to be transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, in The Bahamas.It is expected that if effectively introduced there would be a drastic decrease of overall populations and the risk of the spread of the mentioned mosquito diseases.The five-day seminar, January 15-19, 2018 delivered by Dr. Clelia Oliva, PhD, of the IAEA, consisted of three major topics including an overview of SIT, the intricacies of Aedes rearing, together with design setup and maintenance of an insectary, as well as field surveillance including site selection and establishment.The innovative tool is not a standalone fix for control, but must be practiced with the community’s role in keeping their properties free from water holding containers that breed mosquitoes – which encourages the drill — to tip over, turn down and throw away breeding sites.Release: BISPhoto captions: Header: Lecture session by Dr. C. Oliva of IAEAInsert: Conducting sites selection Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:last_img read more

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