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Boks include six uncapped players in Tri-Nation squad

June 23, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: adzvswdvm.

first_imgBacks Gio Aplon – DHL Western ProvinceBjorn Basson – Vodacom Blue BullsJuan de Jongh – DHL Western ProvinceAdrian Jacobs – The SharksElton Jantjies – MTN LionsPatrick Lambie – The SharksCharl McLeod – The SharksLwazi Mvovo – The SharksOdwa Ndungane – The SharksWynand Olivier – Vodacom Blue BullsRuan Pienaar – UlsterMorne Steyn – Vodacom Blue BullsForwards Heinrich Brüssow – Toyota Free State CheetahsJean Deysel – The SharksDean Greyling – Vodacom Blue BullsAlistair Hargreaves – The SharksRyan Kankowski – The SharksWerner Kruger – Vodacom Blue BullsAshley Johnson – Toyota Free State CheetahsJohann Muller – UlsterCoenie Oosthuizen – Toyota Free State CheetahsChiliboy Ralepelle – Vodacom Blue BullsDanie Rossouw – Vodacom Blue BullsJohn Smit (captain) – The SharksDeon Stegmann – Vodacom Blue BullsAdriaan Strauss – Toyota Free State CheetahsFlip van der Merwe – Vodacom Blue Bulls CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA – JULY 07: John Smit with his team mates during the second day of the South African national rugby team training camp at Florida Park, Ravensmead on July 07, 2011 in Cape Town, South Africa. (Photo by Carl Fourie/Gallo Images/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS John Smit, the most capped internationl Captain leads his team during training Captain John Smit will lead a squad of 27 players drawn from the Springboks’ preliminary Rugby World Cup squad on the away leg of the Castle Tri-Nations Series, it was announced on Friday.Smit, the most capped international captain in Test rugby, will win his 103rd cap against Australia in Sydney on July 23. A week later the Springboks play New Zealand in Wellington.The squad features youth and experience, as well as recognising Vodacom Super Rugby form. There are five Rugby World Cup winners in the squad as well as six uncapped players in flyhalf Elton Jantjies, scrumhalf Charl McLeod, loose forward Ashley Johnson and props Coenie Oosthuizen, Werner Kruger and Dean Greyling. All but Greyling have appeared in non-cap matches for the Springboks.“We’ve rewarded players who have performed outstandingly in Vodacom Super Rugby,” said De Villiers, “although the injury situation has also been critical. But there is a backbone of experience and it means that all our leading players will receive Test exposure this year.”The squad was selected following medical assessments, which identified that a number of players were carrying injuries and required immediate rehabilitation to avoid the risk of break down before the end of the international year. The tour squad will assemble in Johannesburg on Sunday afternoon and leave for Australia on July 15. Castle Tri-Nations tour squad: last_img read more

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A new age for Ireland begins on Sunday

June 23, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: tdruvkbqd.

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS LEICESTER, ENGLAND – SEPTEMBER 08: Niall Morris of Leicester Tigers is tackled by Josh Matavesi of Worcester Warriors during the Aviva Premiership match between Leicester Tigers and Worcester Warriors at Welford Road on September 8, 2013 in Leicester, England. (Photo by Shaun Botterill/Getty Images) Forwards: Stephen Archer, Rory Best, James Coughlan, Sean Cronin, Declan Fitzpatrick, Cian Healy, Jamie Heaslip, Iain Henderson, Chris Henry, Shane Jennings, David Kilcoyne, Mike McCarthy, Jack McGrath, Sean O’Brien, Donncha O’Callaghan, Paul O’Connell, Peter O’Mahony, Mike Ross, Donnacha Ryan, Mike Sherry, Richardt Strauss, Devin Toner, Dan Tuohy.Backs: Isaac Boss, Tommy Bowe, Gordon D’Arcy, Keith Earls, Luke Fitzgerald, Robbie Henshaw, Paddy Jackson, Rob Kearney, Dave Kearney, Ian Madigan, Luke Marshall, Fergus McFadden, Kevin McLaughlin, Niall Morris, Conor Murray, Brian O’Driscoll, Eoin Reddan, Jonathan Sexton, Simon Zebo. Dropping in: Niall Morris of Leicester is in the squad“The group is predominantly ‘tried and proven’ but with some newer faces as well. It’s an opportunity to get to know the players as well as an opportunity to have a look ahead and start to get a little bit of organization done for the series.“There are a number of players such as Tommy O’Donnell, Michael Bent, Stuart Olding, Andrew Trimble, Craig Gilroy and Felix Jones that were not considered due to injury but some of these players may well be involved in the autumn as they return to full fitness and resume playing.“There are also a few players who have not yet had many opportunities to make an impression and a few youngsters who have been impressive in the early rounds of the Pro 12 that we’ve left to keep working with their provinces. There is no doubting the challenge that autumn presents but we’re looking forward to get a little bit of a head start this weekend.”Ireland squad: Thumbs up for now: Joe Schmidt got his happy ending at Leinster, but now the hard work with Ireland beginsGETTING TO know the new man in charge may not be so tough after many of the Ireland squad got to chat with Joe Schmidt during the tour to North America in the summer, but the coach has given himself no excuses for not knowing what he has to work with by naming an extended squad for a meeting at the end of the week.One last time round: Brian O’Driscoll will play his last seasonThe headline is the Brian O’Driscoll has made the 42-man group that will meet at Carlton House on Sunday, as part of preparations for games against Samoa on November 9, Australia on the 16th and the All Blacks on the 24th. However there are also 41 other players involved, some others missing out because of injury and some they are still monitoring outside of the camp.There have been calls for changes to the Irish national side over the last few years and the choice of Schmidt as head coach was seen as a positive move. In order to put his stamp on the side, though, he must work through a lot of sessions, meetings and analysis in order to plump for a team he likes, before going through the arduous task of getting them to play the distinctive brand of attacking rugby we are used to seeing from the Kiwi’s teams.Moulding a team takes time, so these sessions may not be as easy as one would expect and there could be some cramming for those involved. O’Driscoll is there to ease transition, having become an integral part of a Schmidt system in Leinster. It is officially the great centre’s last season in the game and he will want to leave behind something workable, if not quite beautiful yet.The good thing for the new set-up is that there are enough promising young talents in this first  squad meeting and the head coach must be slightly excited by the prospect of making one of them an international star. Nevertheless that comes after he starts handing out hymn sheets for them all to try and sing from.Talking of his squad, Schmidt said: “Selection was difficult as it’s the first time we have had to narrow our focus a bit and determine a cut off point for players. A number of selections were very tight, which is positive.last_img read more

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Jonny Wilkinson announces retirement

June 23, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: idcoqljmx.

first_imgAfter 17 years, Jonny Wilkinson will finally bring down the curtain a hugely successful career that saw him revered as a global icon of the game Defining moment: Thousands of words have been written about Jonny but he will want the minimum of fuss TAGS: Highlight Jonny Wilkinson today, in typically understated fashion, officially notified the rugby world that he was to hang up the boots that struck 1246 glorious points on the international stage at the end of the season.Wilkinson, ever the reluctant hero, released the news through his club Toulon – only the second of a 17-year career – with polite, heartfelt thanks to those who have supported him. “It goes without saying that I have an enormous number of people to thank for their support from all around the world but especially here in France and in England.”He was quick to follow this up with a nod to two defining games of Toulon’s season, a Heineken Cup and Top 14 Final. “This however is not at all the time to be concentrating on this as I would like to focus all my attention and energy on the team and these final two games of the season. I sincerely thank you all for everything you have given me and for making these last seventeen years something I will never forget.”The sentiment was clearly, it’s back to business and winning silverware for the Stade Mayol faithful who have taken him to their hearts. Wilkinson will celebrate his 35th birthday in a matter of days and a future in coaching surely beckons, if he wants it. The quiet man from Frimley can look back on a stellar career full of achievement; 91 caps, six Lions caps, two World Cup finals, four Six Nations titles and a Grand Slam. Domestically, after some barren years at Newcastle Falcons he kickstarted Toulon’s ascent to the pinnacle of domestic rugby and went on to win a Heineken Cup, reach two Amlin Challenge Cup Finals and a week on Saturday he hopes to add a Top 14 title to his bulging Trophy cabinet.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Despite all this subsequent success, it is of course the 2003 Rugby World Cup which was his defining moment as he sent a nation into giddy hysteria out in Sydney with a drop goal in the final minute of extra time. He returned from Australia public property, a fact he openly struggled with. Wilkinson will also be remembered for his indefatigable spirt and refusal to buckle under relentless injuries that blighted four peak years of his career. Many lesser men would have thrown the towel in, but not Jonny. He became a beacon, not only for achieving great success but for courage, humility and embodying the game’s values of respect and modesty.Perhaps the highest compliment you can give him is that he transcended the tribal borders of the international game. Over the years, countless players and fans, whatever their nationality, have cited him as their role model and there can be no greater praise.last_img read more

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World Cup watch: Jonny May in fine form for England

June 23, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: dywkshhfy.

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “But I couldn’t feel sorry for myself because I was desperate to get back in.“Experiences like that can break you or they can make you stronger – and I definitely played some of my best rugby for Gloucester of the back of being dropped.“I have been working my **** off to get another opportunity and I’m pleased to have been able to put it right.“But it’s time to close that chapter now and look forward.”Star turn: Anthony Watson lit up Twickenham on the other wingWith Watson dotting down twice and Goode producing an assured display at full-back, England’s back three were a potent unit. Throw Mike Brown, Jack Nowell and – maybe – Danny Cipriani into the mix and suddenly the cupboard that had looked decidedly bare is now packed with goods. The key now will be to see how May performs against a team who have better wings than France, as Brice Dulin and Sofiane Guitone were dire.But, with a World Cup squad place all but guaranteed and his confidence restored, May now appears ready to illuminate Twickenham on a more regular basis. By Andy Elliott Point made: Jonny May tries to claim a try – later disallowed – but found his way onto the scoresheet AT LONG LAST, that was the performance by Jonny May that England supporters have been waiting for.Gone was the dithering with the ball in hand, the indecisiveness fielding kicks and poor finishing that had resulted in May being dropped from the England team during this year’s Six Nations. In their place was a player full of beans, constantly looking for work and injecting some real pace into the back-line.The 25-year-old scored one excellent try – his fourth in 14 Tests – from Alex Goode’s precision chip in the second half and helped to set up another for his fellow wing Anthony Watson in the first, coming into the line at speed before producing a neat offload in the tackle to put the Bath man in at the corner.It was a display that reminded people of the galloping talent who had scorched past the All Blacks’ world-class outside-centre Conrad Smith and full-back Israel Dagg to score a try that lit up Twickenham in last year’s 24-21 loss to New Zealand.Career highlight: May scored a blistering try against New Zealand in 2014It also fully justified England head coach Stuart Lancaster comment before the World Cup warm-up game against France that the Gloucester wing had been the stand-out player in this summer’s training camps.The doubters who questioned Lancaster’s decision to send home Chris Ashton, Marland Yarde and Semesa Rokoduguni early will now have to pour themselves a big glass of shut-up juice.May admitted after the 19-14 victory over the French that he felt he had “slayed a demon”.“There hasn’t been a day go by when I haven’t thought back to being dropped,” said May. “I was pretty down for the best part of a month after it happened. TAGS: Highlight last_img read more

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Wallaby legend Michael Lynagh sees only the positives of life after his stroke

June 23, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: ekyaaglzf.

first_imgAustralia great Michael Lynagh, a World Cup winner in 1991, talks golf handicaps, jumping at shadows and medical miracles with Rugby World Model pro: at Saracens, Lynagh would visit away grounds before matches to get used to the pitch (Getty)I didn’t have anything, except for my eyes. They can’t explain it. I put it down to pure luck. And at the second stage when they started to do the dehydrating, I see that as the time when being relatively fit and healthy, and pretty dogged and determined, that’s where they kicked in. The fact that I wasn’t hit too bad, that’s just luck because the doctors can’t explain it.RW: You were left with impaired vision that hasn’t changed to this day. Yet you’re on the way to repassing your driving test?ML: Yes, I’ve passed the physical and mental tests and can legally drive, though I’m still awaiting the medical ratification. It’s a matter of scanning, and hearing becomes quite interesting. So having the window down is helpful. But bikes, pedestrians don’t make a lot of noise. Also, being aware of what’s behind you, what’s around you, just taking it pretty easy is the key. They say that after about five years following an event like this you’re normally alright to drive again, you’ve adjusted enough. But this has been three and a half.RW: So that’s the expectation, you just adjust mentally?ML: Yeah, if I look here I can’t see you but (turns head) if I look here I can, so it’s not a big thing. Literally I can’t see you now. There’s no physical difference in vision but you compensate for it. And sometimes my physio, when treating old injuries, he thinks my neck clicks are because I’m turning a bit to the left a lot of the time.So it’s about compensation and I think it’s in the book about train stations and tube stations, when it’s random events and people are coming from different angles, that’s difficult. Walking along Oxford Street, most people are coming towards you but then there are people who come out of shops…Pass go: the Queenslander moves the ball during Australia’s RWC 1991 semi-final win v New ZealandRW: Do you have to walk slower?ML: No, I’m a quick walker. I guess my evasive skills were always pretty good and they’ve come into play with all this. I might see a shadow on the ground and I’ll jump. Sometimes I react and there’s nothing there. Or there’s someone coming and I get a fright because I haven’t seen it. And people look at you and go “Alright?” If I walk with somebody I’ll put them on my left.At my desk (at a commercial property investment group), sometimes people come and stand beside me and I don’t know they’re there. I get a feeling and then turn. They forget as well.RW: Is it a good thing that people forget you’ve had a stroke, because it means you’re treated just like everyone else?ML: Oh yes, I don’t want to be treated any differently. There was one job that I went for – I don’t know if it’s in the book. I was the only candidate left, and I was meeting other board members, and as soon as I’d mentioned that I’d had a stroke, it was “What? When? How?” Funnily enough I didn’t get the job. I’m sure it was because of that. I was a ‘health risk’.RW: How different is your life now?ML: Not that different. I said to Isabella, “If I’m sleeping leave me alone, there are days when I’m going to need afternoon naps on the couch.” She said, “So it’s no different to normal then?” But I did sleep a lot anyway. My rule is still that if I’m tired I have a sleep. I have sat in meetings when I first came back (to work), at about three or four o’clock, and it was hard, so you deal with that by scheduling meetings in the morning.RW: I know you love golf. How that’s going?ML: I almost gave it up. It was terribly difficult because I played off seven or eight, and I loved playing. And I came out and… (despairing shrug) I didn’t play for a year and a bit, apart from having a bit of a putt. Putts this long I was missing this far to the right, every one. So okay, aim a bit more to the left. And then I hit it left instead of straight.Master’s voice: Lynagh is an analyst for Sky TV and part of ITV’s team for the 2015 World Cup (Inpho)I remember playing one game and I just said, “This is too frustrating.” It really was because you knew what you were capable of doing, and then you weren’t capable of playing at all.I couldn’t hit the ball very well, everything’s changed. I came home and said, ‘That’s it, I’m not going to play any more.” And Isabella said, “No, no, just see it as another hurdle that you have to get over. Just be glad you’re out there. You’ve got beautiful courses to play on, you’ve got great friends that don’t mind if you don’t play as well; in fact, they’ll probably take more money off you because of it!”So I started to change my attitude, and I realised that it’s just nice to be out there. My handicap went up to 16, it’s now back down to 12. I played the other week and on one nine I shot one under par.In the swing: driving off the second tee at St Andrews, watched by Kenny Dalglish, in 2001 (Getty Images)RW: One under on the outward nine?!ML: Yeah! But that was the best I’ve played since before the stroke. The back nine wasn’t great but I still played to single figures, which was great. My putting had been a real issue; I’d three or four putt from ten feet. My depth perception wasn’t great, I worked that out along the road too. You know how you get bumps along the footpath? I was tripping up because my depth perception has obviously been affected a little bit. So you have to deal with that. Over time I think my brain’s compensated and worked it out.RW: So can this ‘compensation’ take you back to a handicap of seven again?ML: Possibly, yes. I’ve got some bad habits now because when it happened it made me try and change things to compensate. But I play reasonably enough to be competitive. I’m at the stage where I could hit 100 one day, 80 the next. I’m not very consistent but I’m not the only bloke in the world who’s like that. Some of my friends say it’s got nothing to do with your sight, it’s called age! They could be right. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Gold standard: Lynagh at the 1987 World Cup. He sits eighth in the all-time points list (Pic: Getty Images) center_img Wallaby legend Michael Lynagh sees only the positives of life after his strokeSometimes one autobiography just isn’t enough. Twenty years after publishing a best seller shortly before his international retirement, Michael Lynagh has released a searing read, Blindsided, to cover the stroke that almost took his life in April 2012.Lynagh’s insights into the stressful existence of a goalkicker – he is still Australia’s record scorer, with 911 – are some of the most searchingly honest views ever published on the subject. However, taking centre stage in his book is his stroke, an often-fatal condition that occurs when the blood supply to the brain is cut off.Lynagh describes it as like being hit on the back of the head by a baseball bat, and the story of how this legendary fly-half and 1991 World Cup winner fought back from the brink whilst lying in intensive care in a Brisbane hospital – contemplating whether he had the strength to continue living – is one that will grip any reader.Rugby World caught up with Lynagh to find out more…Recognition: Lynagh and family during the World Rugby Hall of Fame awards in 2014 (World Rugby)Rugby World: Michael, this is a powerful book…Michael Lynagh: Yes, when I saw the first draft I thought ‘Jeez, that’s a bit dramatic’. But Mark (Eglinton, the ghostwriter) said, “That’s what you told me and it is dramatic. Don’t play it down.” I’m sure there will people saying it’s embellished but when you see the snippets from my wife (Isabella), my dad, doctors, other people… I found all those comments really interesting because I hadn’t heard them before, how people reacted and thought about it.RW: You say you had dizzy turns in advance of your stroke. Were they significant?ML: In hindsight they were probably warning signals. They were like the bed spins you get when you’ve had too much to drink, but they would go away very quickly. I probably should have gone to the doctor but when I mentioned it to him (later), he said the event that went bang was nothing to do with it really.RW: What is your take on why the stroke happened?ML: I was flying to Singapore for a speaking engagement but fell asleep at Dubai and missed the connecting flight. Missing the flight was stressful and then I sat in the airport for 12 hours waiting for the next flight. I literally went from Singapore airport to the golf course, playing in 100% humidity and 30-degree heat. Then I was out that night.Home-team hero: Lynagh was a Super Ten champion with Queensland in 1994 (Getty)The next day I had another golf game in the heat and that evening was out again. The next day I had the dinner, and then I found out that as soon as you miss a flight your bookings are all gone, so I was supposed to fly to Brisbane the next day but didn’t have a flight. I was in the hotel trying to sort it out until four in the morning, after speaking at a dinner, which I find pretty stressful anyway.Finally, I got a flight the next day. I was tired and dehydrated, and got off the plane to play golf again, in 30-degree heat again, and having barely slept for four days. While all this might not sound stressful, everything I did was a contributing factor – sleep deprivation, jetlag, dehydration, vigorously swinging a golf club.Then I went and had a couple of beers that night and bang.RW: So it was a cumulative effect but with a final catalyst?ML: It was like the perfect storm of everything coming together and had I not laughed at a joke as the beer went down and choked, nothing would have happened. It needed an event to cause the stroke, and that was the choking. (Lynagh suffered a split vertebral artery, causing a blood clot.)RW: In hospital, they decided not to operate but instead dehydrate you (through drugs) to reduce the swelling…ML: Yes, it wasn’t very comfortable. They woke me every half an hour, for a day and a half, because one of the signs that things are getting worse is that you start to get in a lot of pain but also you lose your speech.I’d be getting off to sleep, then they’d wake me and ask, “What day is it? Who’s the prime minister of Australia? Where are you?” I couldn’t remember the intensive care unit, the ICU. I said, “I know where I am, it’s where really sick people go, I just can’t recall the name!” I couldn’t really remember the days but knew it was somewhere between my son’s birthdayKnockout blow: scoring the late try that beat Ireland in the 1991 World Cup quarter-final (Inpho)and my sister’s birthday. They’d also check to see if I still had strength in both hands, and make me lift my legs. After a while they’d wake me up and I’d go, “Julia Gillard, 14th April, give me your hands and I’ll squeeze them.” I’m glad they didn’t ask me the prime minister question this week, we’re on our fifth in five years!If things had started to get worse, I was ready to be operated on immediately. The operation is a big one, and you’re sitting there and you can’t see and you’ve got this terrible head, you know it’s pretty grave, then they tell you what this operation entails and you think, ‘Jesus, this is serious. This is proper “may not wake up from this” sort of stuff.’ But I was ready.Then they sat at the end of the bed and said, “We’re not going to do it. You’re functioning too well. We don’t know how but you are, and we would never forgive ourselves if we did the operation and something happened. So we’re going to go this way first.” And that became three days of hell (with the dehydration process).RW: Did being a fit, former professional sportsman help you beat the odds?ML: No, I think I was just lucky. Because it hits and that’s it. Neurologists talk about being like electricians but they say they can’t fix the wiring in your head. And it depends what wiring gets touched. In the book there’s a picture of the area of stroke on the brain scan. Normally with that size everything gets hit – walking, hands, speech, everything. Blindsided, by Michael Lynagh, is published by HarperCollins, RRP £20.last_img read more

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Philippines bishop calls for resumption of peace talks

June 20, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: ercinbyyl.

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit an Event Listing [Anglican Communion News Service] The bishop of Northern Philippines in the Episcopal Church of the Philippines, the Rt. Rev. Brent Harry Wanas Alawas, has called for the resumption of peace talks between the National Democratic Front (NDFP) and the Government of the Philippines.Alawas made his comments at a peace rally earlier this month. Thousands of students, employees from the government and non-governmental organizations and many others marched around Bontoc, the central town of the Mountain Province, before converging at the Mountain Province Plaza for an Indignation Rally denouncing the recent New People’s Army ambush in which a police officer was killed and nine others injured.He began his speech with the Hebrew greeting Shalom Beharim, which means peace be upon the mountains, before saying: “We firmly believe that violence is not the way to peace and development.”The bishop added: “Violence does not solve problems; it makes our problems worse. The death, for example, of a soldier or a rebel makes orphans out of children and widows out of mothers. It deprives the affected family, whether soldier, policeman or rebel of its breadwinner, and it causes grief and hatred where there were none before.”He added: “We join other peace advocates and strongly urge the Philippine Government and the National Democratic Front to return to the negotiating table and resume the peace negotiations as soon as possible. The resumption of the peace talks will provide another chance for peace to prevail. It will give us a reason to hope that the causes of the festering problems besetting our province and nation will be addressed in a peaceful way. Meanwhile, the violence must stop: no more ambushes! No more fighting!” Anglican Communion, Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Posted Jul 30, 2013 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Asia Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis center_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Bath, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Philippines bishop calls for resumption of peace talks Rector Smithfield, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listinglast_img read more

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From 5 women in a Nashville home to a nationwide…

June 20, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: adzvswdvm.

first_img Submit a Job Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis October 26, 2013 at 1:03 am Prostitution is a choice. Depravity is never a product of necessity unless that particular path is chosen. The attempt to characterize the prostitute as a victim rather than a dehumanizing co-conspirator is troubling. October 16, 2013 at 7:51 pm The Episcopal Bookstore in Seattle, Washington, is proud to be selling Thistle Farms products. Two hundred fifty women from 31 states joined the Thistle Farms circle during the first Thistle Farms National Conference Oct. 13-15 in Nashville, Tennessee. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Nashville, Tennessee] Back when Regina Mullins was working Dickerson Pike, a Nashville thoroughfare known for prostitutes and drugs, there came a point when she didn’t want to turn another trick or smoke another crack rock.She’d been in-and-out of prison over a 13-year period and she wanted to go back.“I’d lost myself. I believed the lie that there was no way out,” said Mullins, during a Thistle Farms National Conference workshop session Oct. 15. “I started to believe the only safe place was prison.”Mullins was the fifth woman to enter Magdalene. Now clean and sober for 17 years, she is the outreach manager for the two-year residential program for women survivors of prostitution, trafficking, addiction and homelessness started by the Rev. Becca Stevens, the Episcopal chaplain to Vanderbilt University, in 1997.Two-hundred-fifty people – 98 percent women – gathered at the Scarritt Bennett Center Oct. 13-15 for the first-ever national conference bringing together survivors, social workers, lawyers, students, counselors, entrepreneurs, advocates, pastors and volunteers from 31 states to network and learn about Magdalene and Thistle Farms, the social business Stevens started in 2001 to provide work for Magdalene residents and graduates.The Rev. Becca Stevens, founder of Magdalene and Thistle Farms, gave the keynote address opening the Thistle Farms National Conference in Nashville, Tennessee, on Oct. 13. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service“I don’t want people to think that this is a charity, or just a social enterprise or a recovery model – we really are a movement,” said Stevens in an interview with ENS at St. Augustine’s Episcopal Chapel on the edge of Vanderbilt’s campus. “We are a movement of people with small organizations around the country that are trying to come together to change a culture that still buys and sells women as commodities, that still has that tiresome argument about whether or not to legalize prostitution, [a society] that still believes the myth about it [prostitution] being a choice.“I mean it took a lot of broken communities to help women get to the street, so it takes a community to help women come back. And it takes a community that believes in radical love, which is nonjudgmental and that believes in the lavish use of resources just to do healing work,” she said.The conference had three objectives: to launch the Women’s Shared Trade Alliance, which will bring together small, social businesses allowing them to leverage and market their products more efficiently; to provide a space for people engaged or interested in starting similar programs across the country; and to share best practice models through workshops highlighting those best practices.“It is tough work, so the idea of networking with other groups and other people who are doing that same work is so important. So we really want the people in Fort Dodge, Iowa, to meet the folks in Rochester, New York, to Dallas, Texas, to southwest Florida,” said Stevens.“The truth is that once people get to know each other, everyone’s work gets better, the community holds us accountable and holds us up.”The conference included workshops sessions on topics including “housing first” for adult survivors of trafficking and prostitution, post-traumatic stress disorder and second-stage recovery, interrupting the cycle of supply and demand from a criminal justice perspective, survivors’ stories, and how to replicate the Magdalene and Thistle Farms models.Conference attendees had an opportunity to visit Thistle Farms, the 11,000 square foot manufacturing facility where thistle farmers manufacture, package and ship all-natural body care products. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceThistle Farms raises $1 million annually through sales and donations and, as such, is one of the most successful social businesses of its kind in the country. Thistle Farms body care products are sold online and in some 30 Whole Foods markets. Magdalene has helped more than 140 women over the years with a 76 percent success rate.It works like this: Women live in community together for two years at no cost to them, and after four months, during which time they focus on recovery, they go to work either at Thistle Farms or in the community.“We are not a halfway house, a recovery center, a transitional center; we are a home, and finally there is no authority in the house, so it’s a communal model of radical hospitality,” said Stevens. “So it comes out of the Benedictine rule, it’s a belief that community really does heal, and that we need to be together without authority but in relationship to get to some of the deepest wounds we know and have the freedom to move forward.”In addition to housing, Magdalene provides women with financial support, from the moment they walk through the door, and an individualized treatment program, said Cary Rayson, Magdalene’s executive director, during a workshop titled “Housing First for Adult Survivors of Human Trafficking and Prostitution.”Rayson explained that “housing first” is critical for these women, all of whom have suffered childhood abuse, many at the hands of a family member, and who on average first took to the streets when they were between 14 and 16 years old. “You cannot get people who have been abused, trafficked and have prostituted themselves, you cannot get them to stop, without a place to live,” she said. “You’ve got to have a home before you can get better.”Magdalene also raises between $75,000 and $100,000 annually through the “john school.” Men arrested for soliciting a prostitute are given the option to attend the john school, where they hear from counselors, prosecutors and from Magdalene graduates who tell their personal stories of abuse that lead them to the streets.The men who attend the john school are doctors, lawyers, elected officials, husbands, fathers, grandfathers, said Kenny Baker, the school’s volunteer director. By attending the school, the man’s arrest is expunged.“The john could be your husband, your brother,” he said, adding that, for the most part, the men believe they are having consensual sex between adults. “The purpose of the john school is to educate men.”On that fateful day in 1996, the police told Mullins if they saw her walking down the strip again, they’d arrest her. She dared them to, and when they didn’t, she bent down, picked up some rocks, “and busted out the windows” of the patrol car. They arrested her, took her to jail, and later she became the fifth woman to enter Magdalene.“For the first six months, I kept looking for the hook,” said Mullins, explaining she didn’t think Magdalene could possibly be a free program, that women were given a place to live without answering to an authority, and without a catch. “I thought it was too good to be true, you had to give something to get something.”Since 1997, Magdalene has grown to include four residential homes and two transitional homes, for women who complete the two-year program, but who need additional time to transition to living independently.Magdalene Executive Director Cary Rayson, right, led a visit to Lena House, one of Magdalene’s four residences. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceFor many, like Shelia Simpkins McClain, who graduated Magdalene in 2007 after spending 22 years on the streets, the first step is to learn how to care for themselves and make positive choices.“I didn’t come in to get my life back, I didn’t have a life,” said Simpkins McClain, who with nine years of sobriety now serves as Magdalene’s assistant resident manager. “I needed to learn how to live.”Nicholas Kristof featured Simpkins in his Oct. 13 column in the New York Times about and Magdalene and Thistle Farms.Cheryl Oliver, executive director of Oasis House, which provides programs and services to women working in strip clubs and on the streets of Dayton, Ohio, attended the conference to network and learn from Magdalene’s and Thistle Farms’ successes.In her work, Oliver said, she’s noticed a “hierarchy”: women move from strip clubs, where they become addicted to alcohol and drugs, to Backpage.com and then, after they are “used up,” meaning too strung out to work in clubs or find jobs on Backpage.com, to the streets.“Every one of these women are victims of trafficking,” said Oliver.In addition to drug abuse, prostitution, and living on the streets, one thing every woman, without exception, who has come into Magdalene has shared is a history of sexual abuse or molestation, said Stevens and Rayson.The Rev. Suzanne Stoner, a priest associate at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Fayetteville, Arkansas, attended the conference with Kathy McGregor, project director, and Katie Nichol, writing director, of the Northwest Arkansas Prison Story Project, a program that teaches incarcerated women the art of personal storytelling through writing, music and poetry.Twice a year, over a four-month period, artists work with the women and compile their words, describing the abuse and the traumas they’ve endured in their lives, into a 45-minute performance, delivered both inside the prison and also outside at St. Paul’s Church.“We sit there in silence, listening,” said Stoner, adding that some of the words are very difficult to hear. “Words they [the women] live with every day.”The outside performance makes an incredible impact on and challenges the community, Stoner added, saying that through the story project, they have identified the need for a transitional home, a place where women can go following their release from prison, an alternative to being sent back to abusive situations or the streets.In 2000, the United States enacted the Trafficking Victims Protection Act, which defines sex trafficking as a “severe form of trafficking” in which “a commercial sex act is induced by force, fraud or coercion. Magdalene added the term “trafficking” to its program materials a few years ago.Recognizing the seriousness of the issue, the 2009 General Convention of the Episcopal Church passed a resolution calling for “the protection of all victims of human trafficking, particularly women and children, providing necessary attention to their physical, psychological and social needs, and using approaches that respect victims’ rights and integrity.”“This is really some of the most important work the church can do,” said Stevens. “The nice thing that has happened is the Episcopal Church, organically, is really growing this movement.”The Diocese of Louisiana and the Rev. Mitchell Smith, head of Trinity Church, New Orleans, were instrumental in starting Eden House, a Magdalene sister-community that opened its doors in New Orleans in October 2012; it was an Episcopal church in Charleston, South Carolina, that first opened Magdalene; it’s a woman who interned with Magdalene and became an Episcopal priest and opened a house in Rochester based on this model; and the Very Rev. Mike Kinman, of Christ Church Cathedral in St. Louis, has helped to start Magdalene St. Louis; all of which are advancing the church’s role in this work, Stevens said.“So slowly but surely it is a movement,” she said. “And really the Episcopal Church needs … to celebrate that it’s been a part of the frontline work working with women who have survived sexual violence and are healing. I think it’s huge.”Following the Magdalene, Thistle Farms model, Kinman is working with other churches and organizations in St. Louis to create a similar program there.“When I first came to Christ Church Cathedral, I realized the cathedral could be a catalyst for doing something really important,” said Kinman, who attended the conference and who first met Stevens and became acquainted with Magdalene in 1998.“This is the closest thing to the Kingdom of God that I’ve ever seen,” said Kinman. “This is the first step in a wider movement.”— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Release Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest October 16, 2013 at 4:43 pm On Friday, October 11, Becca Stevens received an honorary doctorate from the University of the South for her work. The University’s website has the following statement: “The Rev. Becca Stevens, C’85, has been the chaplain at St. Augustine’s Episcopal Chapel at Vanderbilt University since 1995. In 1997 she founded Magdalene, a residential program serving women survivors of violence, prostitution and addiction. In 2001 she began Thistle Farms, a national bath and body care company run by the women of Magdalene. She is the author of nine books and opened her latest venture, the Thistle Stop Café, in June of this year. Thistle Farms, as a best practice model, has helped more than 20 cities across the country develop similar programs, and also has partnerships with four women’s cooperatives in Rwanda, Kenya, Ghana and Ecuador. Stevens has been featured on ABC, NPR, PBS, CNN, the Huffington Post and Christian Century; was named by the White House as one of 15 “Champions of Change;” was named “Tennessean of the Year” and Nashville’s 2011 Social Entrepreneur of the Year; and in 2010 was the youngest recipient of Sewanee’s Distinguished Alumnus award. She will be the Babson Center for Global Commerce’s Humphreys Entrepreneur in Residence this fall. Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Albany, NY October 16, 2013 at 9:51 pm Amen to Love!! TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Teresa Marie Staal Cowley says: October 16, 2013 at 5:11 pm This story needs wider publication. Any church that does this type of ministry is nowhere near dead. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL October 18, 2013 at 2:07 pm Great story……………………blessings……………………:) PJ Cabbiness says: December 2, 2013 at 5:40 pm Thanks to Anne Avery for speaking to the frequent error of believing that prostitution is a choice. It is very hard to understand how difficult lives can be when you’re looking through the eyes of one who is privileged to live in a safe and supportive environment. Such positive conditions are not present in every one’s lives, and it especially behooves church women to pick up the reins for changing those conditions whenever and however we can. I believe that is one of the roles for the UN’s Commission on the Status of Women as well as the women’s circles within The Episcopal Church. From 5 women in a Nashville home to a nationwide movement Thistle Farms hosts first national conference Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET October 17, 2013 at 12:04 pm It is stories like this that reconfirms and validates my membership with the Episcopal Church. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Anne Avery says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI October 28, 2013 at 7:25 pm Cabbiness: Prostitution is not a choice when one is sexually abused early on or kidnapped, beaten and denigrated which is what happens to far too many young women. Teenagers are being kidnapped off the streets of Seattle and FORCED into prostitution by vicious pimps who have no respect for anyone. Some parents and other family members are abusive. When you are told over and other that you are useless and without value, you begin to believe it. PTSD is real is these women. Kathy Atkinson says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Kathy Atkinson says: Rector Bath, NC center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Pam Jordan Anderson says: Featured Events Human Trafficking Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group October 17, 2013 at 10:26 am The Rev. Becca Stevens will be our keynote speaker at our annual diocesan Ministry & Mission Conference on May 3, 2014. All are welcome. We are very excited about her presentation and ministry. Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Nancy Marshall says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bruce Green says: Marge Christie says: Rector Shreveport, LA October 17, 2013 at 10:28 am The M&M Conference on May 3, 2014 is in Asheville, NC. James Dunkly says: Press Release Service Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Knoxville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit an Event Listing Comments (11) Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Comments are closed. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC By Lynette WilsonPosted Oct 16, 2013 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Fr. Michael Neal says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, ILlast_img read more

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Están disponibles las pautas para subvenciones de la Ofrenda Unida…

June 20, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: ixyfmqzbo.

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Events Featured Jobs & Calls [5 de noviembre de 2013] Las pautas para solicitar las subvenciones del 2014 de la Ofrenda Unida de Acción de Gracias están disponibles aquí.La solicitud para las subvenciones de la Ofrenda Unida de Acción de Gracias estará disponible el 3 de enero de 2014.El enfoque para las subvenciones 2014-2015 de la Ofrenda Unida de Acción de Gracias es el Evangelio del amor proclamado por Jesucristo.De Importancia:La Ofrenda Unida de Acción de Gracias aceptará:•una solicitud de subvención por diócesis dentro de la Iglesia Episcopal;•una solicitud adicional para subvención en diócesis compañera de la diócesis que la Iglesia  pueda presentar. Esta relación podría formarse con una diócesis de la Iglesia Episcopal o de la Comunión Anglicana. Las diócesis patrocinadoras serán responsables de la contabilidad de la subvención.La Ofrenda Unida de Acción de Gracias no financiará:• lugar del proyecto/ programas de dos años consecutivos de proyectos• campañas de capital o reducciones de deuda• mantenimiento diferido (las reparaciones o mejoras en las instalaciones o planta física deben estar unidas al ministerio especifico o proyecto de la solicitud actual)• los presupuestos de funcionamiento (es decir, el presupuesto y el programa propuesto es el mismo que el año anterior);• deudas obligadas o incurridas antes de la fecha de la concesión de la subvención;• compra de artículos de consumo (por ejemplo; alimentos, medicamentos, productos de papel, artículos de aseo, combustible, etc.);• becas, matrícula, cuotas del campamento, y los incentivos de asistencia;• Atención o Control de emergencia.En Diócesis Episcopales dentro de los Estados Unidos, la Ofrenda Unida de Acción de Gracias NO financiará:• un vehículo con un chasis de 12 o 15 pasajeros (debido a la estabilidad y asuntos de seguros);• peticiones financiadas anteriormente;• programas considerados como presupuestos de operación en diocesanos.Para obtener más información sobre las estas pautas, comuníquese con la Rda. Heather Melton, coordinadora de la Ofrenda Unida de Acción de Gracias, [email protected] Rector Albany, NY center_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Posted Nov 5, 2013 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit an Event Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Están disponibles las pautas para subvenciones de la Ofrenda Unida Acción de Gracias Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL last_img read more

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Eligen a Margaret Swinson vicepresidente del Consejo Consultivo Anglicano

June 20, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: tdruvkbqd.

first_img Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Job Listing ACC16, Anglican Communion, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Eligen a Margaret Swinson vicepresidente del Consejo Consultivo Anglicano El Consejo elige también a cinco representantes del Comité Permanente de la Comunión Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Margaret Swinson, miembro laica de la Iglesia de Inglaterra, fue electa el 18 de abril por aclamación para ser la próxima vicepresidente del Consejo Consultivo Anglicana. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.[Episcopal News Service – Lusaka, Zambia] El Consejo Consultivo Anglicano eligió por aclamación el 18 de abril a Margaret Swinson, la delegada laica de la Iglesia de Inglaterra, para que sea su próxima vicepresidente.Swinson, que fue electa sin oposición, sucederá a Elizabeth Paver, también miembro laica de la Iglesia de Inglaterra.Ella es contadora diplomada de la Diócesis de Liverpool, trabaja a media jornada como secretaria de una compañía con responsabilidad en el gobierno corporativo, según reza en la biografía de su nominación y también ejerce su profesión por cuenta propia.Swinson se incorporó al CCA en su reunión de 2012 en Auckland y ha sido miembro del Sínodo General de la Iglesia de Inglaterra desde 1985, tiempo en el cual ha dedicado 11 años en presidir debates. Swinson también fue parte de lo que finalmente fue el empeño exitoso de permitir que las mujeres fueran ordenadas y consagradas obispas en la Iglesia de Inglaterra.Swinson se juntará con el Rvdmo. Paul Kwong, arzobispo y primado de Hong Kong, el recién electo presidente del CCA, para formar el liderazgo del Consejo al cierre de esta reunión. Los períodos de Kwong y Swinson se extenderán hasta la clausura del CCA-19. El Consejo se reúne normalmente cada tres o cuatro años.El Consejo eligió también cinco representantes al Comité Permanente de la Comunión. Ellos son:Jane Alexander, obispa de la Diócesis de Edmonton, Iglesia Anglicana del Canadá.Alistair Dinnie, Iglesia Episcopal de Escocia.Jeroham Meléndez, Iglesia Anglicana de la Región Central de AméricaNigel Pope, Iglesia de la India (Unida)Joel Waweru, de la Diócesis de Nairobi, Iglesia Anglicana de Kenia.A las elecciones al Comité Permanente se presentaron once miembros del CCA. Los otros nominados fueron:Bartholomayo Bol Deng, Provincia de la Iglesia Episcopal de Sudán del Sur y del Sudán.Nicholas Drayson, obispo de la Diócesis del Norte de Argentina, Iglesia Anglicana de América del Sur.Sepiuta Camellia Hala’api’api, Iglesia Anglicana en Aotearoa, Nueva Zelanda y Polinesia.Arthur Morris Tendayi Mutsonziwa, Iglesia de la Provincia de África Central.Shunila Ruth, Iglesia del Pakistán (Unida)Yossa Way, Iglesia Anglicana del CongoEl obispo Eraste Bigirimana de la Iglesia Anglicana de Burundi y Louisa Lette-Mojela, delegada laica de la Iglesia Anglicana de África del Sur, continuarán en el Comité Permanente hasta el fin de sus períodos de servicio.El Comité Permanente es un grupo de 14 miembros (15, si el arzobispo de Cantórbery está presente, ya que él es miembro ex officio, así como su presidente). Siete de sus miembros son elegidos por los miembros del CCA, y cinco son miembros del Comité Permanente de los Primados. Los otros dos miembros son el/la presidente y el/la vicepresidente del CCA. El comité es el brazo ejecutivo del CCA, encargado de llevar adelante su trabajo entre una y otra reunión.La 16ª. reunión del Consejo Consultivo Anglicano en la catedral de la Santa Cruz comenzó el 8 de abril y se extendió hasta el 19.Lea más al respectoLos antecedentes del CCA se encuentran aquí.La información actualizada de ENS sobre el CCA puede encontrarse aquí.La página de noticias de la Cámara de Diputados también está publicando artículos sobre la reunión.A los comunicados de Twitter se accede con #ACCLusaka.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Anglican Consultative Council Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Apr 20, 2016 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MIlast_img read more

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Mothers’ Union calls for women’s voices to be heard in…

June 20, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: oysnvzlet.

first_img Rector Belleville, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Service To coincide with International Women’s Day, the Mothers’ Union has issued a statement urging more involvement for women in peace negotiations.Full statement, via Anglican Communion News Services. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Anglican Communion An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Mothers’ Union calls for women’s voices to be heard in peace, reconciliation Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Posted Mar 8, 2017 Rector Bath, NC Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

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