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Inside The Rapidly-Rising, Bubble-Bursting Culture Of Music Festivals

March 2, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: lprxfsblu.

first_imgThere are few experiences that can top a music festival weekend.Something that was once a counterculture, hippie escape from the lulls of the rat race is now a key cog in mainstream society and almost a rite of passage for young people. And make no mistake, the exponential growth of the scene has been nothing short of extraordinary.According to Nielsen Music, in 2014, 32 million people attended at least one music festival, and nearly half of them were millennials.That statistic is particularly telling, because it explains the heavy amount of sponsorship dollars that flow into these events, seeking the approval of the most desirable demographic on the market. An AEG, LLC report said that North American-based companies spent $1.34 billion sponsoring music venues, festivals and tours in 2014, and that number has increased like clockwork over the past five years. Anheuser-Busch was responsible for a third of it.These days we have over 800 festivals to choose from, and that number is constantly changing. Still visible in the rear-view mirror are the years when regionally-based offerings like Bonnaroo, High Sierra, Sasquatch! and Austin City Limits (ACL) were all that we had.While each festival had its own unique aesthetic, at the core, they were all the same. They provided a rare opportunity to separate from society and submerge in another world, where you could explore the simplest pleasures in life without judgment or consequence.A decade ago, there were no smart phones or selfie sticks in the air — just hands and gravity-friendly fans seeking a better view. Social media hadn’t been invented yet. Silent disco was the only way you could describe the 3 a.m., music-less dance party at your neighbor’s campsite.Festivalgoers had nothing but good vibes, memories and stories to take home. They fostered communal relationships and created festival families through shared experiences that brought them back each year. Thankfully, those elements have not and will not change.But it’s not all sunshine and smiles. Behind the scenes, the economics of this boom have created a hierarchy that’s replaced grassroots events with corporate ones, as entities like AEG and Live Nation have become major players. We’ve seen many familiar and beloved staples fall by the wayside at a much higher rate since.So, how did all this happen? What factors sparked this exponential boom? And beyond that, what are the effects — both good and bad — of this seemingly oversaturated space?In an attempt to answer these questions, we spoke with industry members on different sides of the phenomenon to gain some perspective on the fascinating and rapid evolution of music festivals in the 21st century.FROM LAST LINE TO HEADLINEAs Umphrey’s McGee was picking up steam in South Bend, Indiana in the late-1990s, getting to play music festivals was a priority.It’s a strategy many bands employ early in their career, and UM was no different, hoping to put their progressive rock jams in front of larger audiences in new markets. After UM built a respectable network, the doors were opened to Quincy, California’s High Sierra Music Fest in 2001.“That was our first glimpse into what the festival world was and, of course, a year later Bonnaroo happened,” said UM keyboardist Joel Cummins. “At least — for our scene — that felt like it really changed everything.”The inaugural Bonnaroo was a much different animal than its present-day form. In 2002, Widespread Panic, Trey Anastasio, Ben Harper, The String Cheese Incident and Phil Lesh stood atop the lineup. Its supporting cast resembled something more akin to Mountain Jam or Summer Camp.The first Bonnaroo SuperJam consisted of Michael Kang from SCI, Béla Fleck, and Robert Randolph. To put that in perspective, last year’s ensemble featured over a dozen artists including Pretty Lights, Run DMC, Rob Trujillo (Metallica), and Chance the Rapper. Cummins was actually part of the SuperJam madness in 2014.With 70,000 people attending the ‘02 Bonnaroo, that afternoon set provided one of the largest crowds UM had ever played in front of. What made it even better was that it was at a festival with a cohesive, complementary lineup that reeled in an audience that embraced their sound.“The difference between a festival, which we call a soft-ticket play, versus an ‘Evening with Umphrey’s McGee’, is somebody’s buying a ticket just to come see you at a club or theater,” said UM manager Kevin Browning. “At a festival, that’s part of the experience. You pay one price and you go and you’re excited about the bands that you’re excited about, but it’s also an opportunity to discover. For us, that was huge because it’s hard to get the word out. It was hard then and it’s hard now. If you’re good enough and you’re entertaining enough, when you go play these places and there’s new ears and eyes — we gained a lot of fans over the years from those festivals.”The rise of UM has been on a parallel path beside American music festivals, as the infrastructure beyond the gates flung them from their beaten path onto the paved one. They went from a last-line Bonnaroo artist to a festival headliner and a band that could sell out arenas and fill amphitheaters.FROM COUNTERCULTURE TO SUBCULTUREThere’s no correct or, for that matter, simple answer as to what caused the music festival boom. What is clear is that there are a number of factors that created this live music super cell.The most glaring of them is money. As ticket prices have soared, so have the profits.Complex Magazine reported that in 2014, in terms of gross revenue, Electric Daisy Carnival generated $322 million and Coachella raised $254 million. Ultra, which had nearly 200 less artists than its West Coast peers, was able to bring in $200 million.“You see the opportunity that promoters saw in large-scale events like this. They’re high-risk but they’re very high reward,” Browning explained. “From a promoter’s standpoint, if they’re doing hundreds of shows a year at bars and clubs and whatnot, the margins on a festival are a lot better than the margins on a club show. Everybody wants to throw cool events and everyone wants to throw parties, and at the end of the day, it became clear that people want to go to live music festivals and there was a demand that wasn’t being met based on the amount of traffic that they could support.”Advancements in mobile technology and the rise of social media have also played a massive role in filling out these events . Following artists and the entire music scene has never been easier, thanks to blogs (like this one) and social media platforms.Listening to music and expanding one’s palate has become an instantaneous exercise with a few swipes and thumb punches on a smart phone standing in the way. As the artist impressions stack up, so does our desire to see them beyond the screen.Since our networks are accessible within our pocket, the subconscious fear of missing out has become a potent undercurrent within the culture. Festivals like Coachella, New Orleans Jazz Fest, and Hangout began putting on live broadcasts and, since then, it’s become an integral part of extending their reach. Recap videos have become a trademarked part of the experience, helping relive the scenes and moments in a different perspective days and weeks after they’re over.Festivals offer a perfectly-packaged, sharable experience that can be linked to a hashtag and sent out into the world in a matter of seconds, creating a conversation without borders. The first weekend of Coachella 2015 garnered 3.5 million tweets. #WarpedTour was used more than 1.2 million times on Instagram last year.This technological revolution isn’t limited to our end, either. Production capabilities have bolstered performance standards, creating countless ways to deliver music that touches on all our senses.Producers and DJs have become so talented and so undeniable that electronic dance music has come out of the warehouses and into the daylight, transforming the festival culture.The IMS Business Report 2015 stated that the EDM market had reached an eye-popping $6.9 billion, and 26 percent of all nightlife events around the world were EDM related.So it’s no coincidence that some of the largest and most lucrative festivals on the planet are centered around EDM and, as it’s evolved, the drug movement that followed is simply a natural progression of it.Like LSD was to the 1960s and ‘70s, MDMA is to the right now.“This is basically the mass commercialization of an underground culture that was already alive and well,” Browning said. “There’s no doubt (the EDM) scene has been responsible for a ton of the growth, because you’re talking about a captive audience that has a relatively large disposable amount of income and they like to come together and do drugs and that was apparent to (many successful promoters out there).”For UM, climbing lineups required some sonic evolution as society’s preferences began to change. They never made a conscious effort to change their sound, but there was some natural selection involved. The desire to experiment and incorporate different equipment opened the doors to untapped electronic potential with the band’s improvisation.Many of those elements gave way to originals like “Cemetery Walk II” or “Day Nurse,” and helped UM feel comfortable in festivals like Counterpoint and Electric Forest.“I love the fact that we can cross-pollinate here and do events like Summer Camp in Illinois that are still very rooted in the live music thing … or we can be just as much as home in a more electronic environment,” Cummins said. “For that matter, I can say that we’d be just as comfortable doing an acoustic set at Telluride Bluegrass Festival. I think our versatility is something that’s really helped us continue to prosper in the festival game.”UM is just one small piece of the overall scale that began tipping toward that world.Purple Hat Production’s Paul Levine, one of the biggest forces behind Florida’s Spirit of Suwannee Music Park (SOSMP), who’s been putting on shows for more than two decades, has had a front-row seat to this shift.Levine’s view of the EDM takeover echoes Cummins’ analogy of it being a “gateway drug to more of the live performances.”“It’s not everyone’s cup of tea, but people just want to dance, and that music appeals to them. Some EDM appeals to really young people, but when we were all young, we had to be introduced to music in a certain way. Some of it is more sophisticated (than others),” said Levine. “Whatever gets people out to music festivals, hopefully they have an opportunity to be exposed to lots of new things. As people grow up, their tastes evolve. Some will be EDM fans for life and some may move on from that and start loving folk music or afrobeat — who knows. What I’m seeing is a lot of music fans that like all sorts of music so I think it’s important that, as time goes on, everybody is more open-minded to new music, new mediums, and new forms of creativity.”And that might be the most important place to look — at the communal mindset of people who go to festivals.“It’s generally good-willed people,” Cummins said. “I think it starts with the notion of the band, a group of musicians who are trying to create something together that is bigger than the sum of the parts … there’s some sort of interaction between the band and the audience that can be this really magical, powerful thing.”Beyond the social media or opportunities to eat drugs or chase experiences, it’s the unique chance to bond through live music with other like-minded people that’s bringing festival fans back for more.“There really is a special love that’s there that’s not the same for a big Metallica festival (for example). There’s a little more aggression and a little more angst and a little more frustration that people are taking out, and our music seems to be based on more of the ‘love your brothers and sisters’ model,” Cummins said. “In today’s times it’s become even more important and relevant. There’s just so much hate and awful bigotry out there in the world, and music is really something that brings people of all different beliefs and ethnicities and all this together. They can come together and embrace something and enjoy something without having to judge. I wish that more people were able to experience that and be able to feel that and be a part of something. The world would definitely a better place.”EFFECTS OF AN OVERSATURATED FESTIVAL SCENEObviously, there’s a cost associated with everything and, like every space that sees exponential growth, there are positive and negatives that follow.As the number of festivals continued to rise in the late-2000s, the competition and pricing market amongst them became more intense.That’s not just on tickets, either. Booking artists became increasingly difficult as the country became more densely populated with music fests. A contract’s radius clause, which limit shows an artist can play within a certain time and distance of an event, made the selection process a delicate balancing act.Naturally, the deeper the pockets a production company has, the more likely they are to win the battle.“Everyone wants to have a festival. The reason there’s so many and — particularly the big ones — there’s a lot of corporate money and sponsorship dollars (invested),” Levine said. “Businesses are putting up large amounts of money to do certain things and perhaps overpaying artists, which inflates the price structure. It’s become harder and harder for smaller, grassroots promoters to get fairer deals on headliners because they don’t have as much buying power as the bigger interests.”That’s diminished the complementary nature the festival circuit once had, and the hierarchy that’s followed has affected the sustainability of smaller, boutique events.The last year alone we’ve seen many longtime staples and household names in their respective corners of the country shut down.On June 24, 2015, one of the most beloved festivals in the Southeast, Bear Creek, had to cancel its ninth installment at SOSMP. Specifics weren’t provided with the announcement, but it’s not far-fetched to imagine the potency of Suwannee Hulaween, which drew in 20,000 people last fall, played a role. BC even tried to change its date to the first weekend in October, but it wasn’t enough to keep it afloat.Phases of the Moon moved from the headache that was Danville, Illinois to Mulberry Mountain in Ozark, Arkansas for its second year, but went down in flames in September, citing “a significant number of unforeseen obstacles, including the continued closure of the only road leading into the festival site.”In the aftermath, Pipeline Productions failed to refund tickets within the 90-day window it promised, which indicated financial woes were likely to blame. According to the ongoing discussion on the Phases Facebook page, many ticket buyers have still not received refunds.That situation has even affected Pipeline’s most successful event, Wakarusa, which, after 12 years, recently announced that it will not take place in 2016. The December announcement stated that the company “was significantly damaged by partners claiming to share our vision. Sadly, they lied. They are being dealt with appropriately through the legal system.”After nearly two decades, All Good Festival announced its retirement and that it would be devolving into a two-day event at Merriweather Post Pavilion in July.“You hate to see something that’s established go, but there’s only room for so many players,” Browning said. “It’s a cutthroat world out there.”But even some of the biggest events in the country aren’t immune to the unsympathetic ways of the festival market.TomorrowWorld — one of the largest EDM festivals in the country that reeled in more than $85 million in revenue in 2014 — is not happening this year, stating last week that “unfortunately in the current environment, it is not possible to give you the best and unique experience you deserve.”TomorrowWorld came under fire on its swing day last year, after thousands of single-day festivalgoers were stranded without food, water and shelter overnight because weather conditions made roads into the festival grounds unsafe. In fear of a repeat, the festival closed the third day off to commuters, which led to refunds of 150,000 tickets for Sunday.No matter how big or how small, any festival can go under in this climate. Whether it is competition, poor money management, a disjointed lineup, a failed location change, or a haphazard planning — as the saying goes, the road to hell is paved with good intentions.As ugly as the economics and the corporatization of music fests might be, their existence still transcends all of the negative things that might be happening at the top.Sure, smaller festivals are becoming obsolete, but Browning doesn’t believe the oversaturation of the scene is detracting from the end-goal that inspired it.“I’m not overly-cynical about it because ultimately the experience that one person has or a group of friends has is no less powerful if it’s at an event with 1,000 people in rural Arkansas or with 100,000 people at Lollapalooza in downtown Chicago,” he said. “You’re creating moments and memories with your crew. I don’t value the experiential elements of the bigger, wealthier festivals as better than the small, more intimate, less-funded ones. It’s entirely up to the music fan. It’s what gets them off and that’s all that matters.”The festival landscape is constantly changing, and we’ll be saying goodbye to sacred grounds where countless memories were forged each and every year.For a day or maybe a week after the news breaks, we’ll reconnect with those who were with us that weekend and mourn the loss, but eventually we’ll move on because the beautiful thing about this explosion is that there’s another festival we’ve considered going to and a new lineup announcement to gush over next week.It might not be as intimate as Bear Creek or as inviting as All Good, but with your festival crew nearby, cold drink in-hand and good music on-stage, it’s still going to be one hell of a weekend.[Photos reprinted, by Dave Vann, Phierce Photo, and Patrick Hughes]last_img read more

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SoundCloud Is Reportedly Considering Selling Their Company For $1 Billion

March 2, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: zuwmcftfp.

first_imgOnline streaming giant SoundCloud has been in financial trouble for some time now, and it seems the company’s founders are considering drastic steps to maintain their product. According to a news item in Bloomberg, the owners of the German-based company are mulling over the option of selling their company for a steep $1 billion sum.Though Bloomberg’s sources wished to remain private during any potential negotiations, SoundCloud is indeed “exploring strategic options” for the business. While they may ultimately opt not to sell, it appears as though serious measures will need to be taken in order to make SoundCloud profitable. The streaming site found a niche as a place for anyone to share and discover music, such as their recently-introduced premium service with fewer ads and increased access. There are also premium accounts for artists, based on storage space and additional features.If SoundCloud is priced at $1 Billion, we can only hope that any corporate entity looking to take over the site doesn’t change it for the worse.last_img read more

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The Delta Saints Rock Out In New Live Video For ‘Dust’ [Premiere]

March 2, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: ercinbyyl.

first_imgNashville band The Delta Saints recently released a special edition of their album Bones with Loud & Proud Records, packaging the acclaimed 2015 release with six bonus tracks, including three b-sides and three live versions of album tracks, that were recorded during the filming of live performance music videos at Downtown Presbyterian Church in Nashville. The Delta Saints have been garnering praise for a sound that is all their own, but with hints of My Morning Jacket, The Black Keys and The White Stripes thrown in for good measure. They even received an stellar endorsement from the legendary Chrissie Hynde, who was a guest on Bravo’s “Watch What Happen Live” last year and told a caller that she saw The Delta Saints play Akron, OH, that they are a “great band” and suggested that people buy Bones –  watch HERE. With the new special edition of Bones, the band has been releasing accompanying videos in support of the new release. Singer Ben Ringel tells us about the third and final video in the series, for the song “Dust.” Says Ringel, “Dust is the third and final chapter of our Live at 5th & Church video series… our videographer Tim Duggan had a vision for us all standing back up against a wall and having the cameras just moving left and right, really just trying to catch the right moments. We tracked the song live so what you’re hearing and seeing was played in real time, which made Tim’s job a bit tricky.”Watch the premiere of “Dust,” streaming below.Ringel tells us more about “Dust,” saying “The story for Dust came about after a conversation that I had with my grandfather about his childhood. He was a young boy living on his family’s farm in Kansas during the dust bowl. They used to sit and watch the mid-day sky turn black from mountains of dust being moved across the plains. I imagine back then it was a bit of a harrowing religious experience that no one could explain.” The down-home nature of the song shines through with every note.The Delta Saints have spent the last nine years playing festivals and selling out headline shows in the U.S. and across Europe, averaging about 200 shows per year, organically growing their audience all the while. They have performed at several festivals in the U.S. including Summer Camp, Harvest, The Ride, Summerfest, Wakarusa and The Simple Man Cruise. After just returning from a European tour, the band will hit the road throughout the U.S. with a major summer tour, beginning on August 17th. Check out the band’s full tour schedule below, and head here for more information about the group! Purchase the Bones special edition through iTunes now.The Delta Saints U.S. Tour ScheduleAug 17 – Pour House in Raleigh, NC Aug 18 – Clementine Café in Harrisonburg, VA Aug 19 – Mercury Lounge in New York, NY Aug 20 – Milkboy in Philadelphia, PA Aug 21 – The Hamilton in Washington, DC Aug 22 – Club Café in Pittsburgh, PA Aug 24 – Rumba Café in Columbus, OH Aug 25 – Beat Kitchen in Chicago, IL Aug 26 – Duck Room @ Blueberry Hill in University City, MO Aug 27 – Jackpot Music Hall in Lawrence, KS Aug 31 – Black Sheep in Colorado Springs, CO Sep 01 – Marquis Theatre in Denver, CO Sep 03 – New Belgium Tour De Fat in Fort Collins, CO Sep 09 – Black Swamp Arts Festival in Bowling Green, OHSep 10 – Zanzabar in Louisville, KYlast_img read more

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Willie Nelson, Neil Young, Chris Robinson & More Play The Inaugural Outlaw Music Festival [Gallery]

March 2, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: yzhnxslpc.

first_imgLast weekend boasted the inaugural Outlaw Music Festival, taking place over one day – September 18th – at the beautiful Montage Mountain near Scranton, PA. Hosted by Willie Nelson, the event featured sets from Neil Young + Promise Of The Real, Chris Robinson Brotherhood, Sheryl Crow, Brothers Osborne and Lee Ann Womack. The Outlaw spirit was in full force, as these iconic artists turned in tremendous performances for an adoring crowd. With Willie Nelson and his children Lukas and Mikah playing as well, this was truly a special and memorable.Thanks to photographer Sam Watson, we now have a full gallery of images from the festival for you to enjoy. Take a look through the gallery below! We’ll see you there next year. Load remaining imageslast_img

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BIG Something & The Fritz Team Up For A Jam Throwdown [Gallery]

March 2, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: pllavecyf.

first_imgBIG Something and The Fritz convened last weekend, treating fans at the Charleston Pour House in Charleston, SC to an explosive display of jam rock music. The evening started with a set from The Fritz, the funky crew based out of Asheville, who even included a start/stop jam session where they would freeze in the style of the mannequin challenge! The night continued with BIG Something, another quickly-rising jam group out of NC. They worked covers of “Burning Down The House” and “Sympathy For The Devil” into their setlist. Woo woo! They also were joined by Fritz’s Jamar Woods on a rendition of “My Volcano,” bringing the house down with the great collaboration.Check out a full gallery from this exciting night of music, courtesy of Ellison White Photography, and the BIG Something setlist below.Setlist: BIG Something | Charleston Pour House | Charleston, SC | 11/26/16Burning Down The House (Talking Heads), Blue Dream, Megalodon, My Volcano* w/ Jamar Woods, Passenger, Tumbleweed, Song for Us, Sympathy for the Devil (Rolling Stones), UFOs are Real, Bbm Funk (B flat minor), Love Generator, Julia BrownE: Give It to Me Baby (Rick James), Pinky’s RideNotes: Entire show with Todd Pettit on percussion Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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Watch Dopapod’s Neal “Fro” Evans Sit In With Aqueous For Queens Of Stone Age Cover

March 2, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: nexmcumgj.

first_imgHowever, the night didn’t end there, as Aqueous’ then continued their night by zipping over to The Sinclair, where moe. was winding down their four-night stand in Cambridge. Guitarist Al Schnier had the idea for members of Aqueous to emerge on the band’s instruments for the encore to surprise the audience. Aqueous obliged, with Mike Gantzer on Chuck’s guitar, Evan McPhaden on a Rob’s bass, Dave Loss on Al’s guitar, and Rob Houk on Vinnie’s drums, to kick off moe.’s Saturday night encore. Aqueous played an improvisational jam before closing with hints of an Aqueous original, “Random Company,” before switching back with the moe. members who closed out with “Comfortably Numb” cover by Pink Floyd. You can also take a listen to the moe. show below, courtesy of taper tgakidis.[Cover photo: Capacity Images]Setlist: moe. | The Sinclair | Cambridge, MA | 4/08/17I: Zed Naught Z > Same Old Story > Bring You Down, Chromatic Nightmare#, Captain America, Montego, Where Does The Time Go? > WaterII: Kids > Lazarus, Letter Home > Faker > Same Old Story > Zed Naught Z, Gone > Deep This TimeIII: Skrunk > Kids, banter, Buster, Angel, St. Augustine > Same Old Story, crowd, al.nnouncementsE: Aqueous band swap, banter/crowd, Comfortably Numb# w/ Water Intro Fake Out On April 8th, Aqueous and Dopapod hit the Paradise Rock Club in Boston, Massachusetts, continuing their tour of the smokin’ of the Northeast. Aqueous kicked off the night, and during their five-song set, they invited a special guest out to share the stage with them. For their fourth song, following “Skyway,”  which jammed into through “Halfway In, Halfway Out,” the band invited their friend, Dopapod’s drummer Neal “Fro” Evans, to join them on a heavy cover of Queens of the Stone Age “No One Knows.” You can check out a video of this special sit-in via MK Devo below, who caught the cover in all its glory and just released pro-shot multi-cam footage from the night.last_img read more

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This Mind-Bending Audiovisual Dome At Coachella Made Everyone Lose Their Shit [Watch]

March 2, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: adzvswdvm.

first_imgThis year’s Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival offered no shortage of entertainment value, including performances by Kendrick Lamar, Radiohead, Lady Gaga, award-winning film composer Hans Zimmer, and many more, along with various art installations and other festival grounds fare. But perhaps the most awe-inspiring sensory display at the popular California desert event was “Chrysalis,” an 8-minute psychedelic experience projected onto a massive geodesic dome. The 360° audiovisual spectacle starts with a “Shamanistic rite-of-passage ceremony,” and embarks from there on a breathtaking cosmic odyssey.Obscura Digital, the firm responsible for the exhibit, is a San Francisco-based creative technology studio that orchestrates entertaining, informative, and educational experiences with interactive installations, large-format architectural projections, and immersive environments that generate a sense of awe and inspiration for live audiences. Thanks to the Obscura, you can watch footage of the entire light show below (though, of course, a conventional video can’t really come close to capturing the full Antarctic Dome experience):You can also watch Obscura Digital’s official recap video from the installation, which gives some added perspective on the awesome scale of the spectacle and the dumbstruck reactions of its thoroughly satisfied patrons:As the project’s Creative Director Joshua Pipic explained to Vice, “The power of it is that it’s not just a VR headset—it giant and powerful and really takes up all the space in front of your eyes. People overuse the word ‘immersive,’ but it’s the most immersive thing I’ve ever worked on.” And when Pipic says this is the most “immersive” project he’s worked on, you can trust it’s coming from a reliable source: Obscure has designed and brought to life innovative audiovisual exhibitions on the facades of such iconic structures Empire State Building, St. Peter’s Basilica, The Sydney Opera House, and more. You can check out more of Obscura’s incredible work on their website.[h/t – Vice][Cover photo via Obscura Digital]last_img read more

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Watch Preservation Hall Jazz Band’s Hour-Long Intimate Performance In Apogee Recording Studio [Pro-Shot]

March 2, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: pllavecyf.

first_imgOn Morning Becomes Eclectic on KCRW, an NPR member station in Santa Monica, California, last week, the infamous Preservation Hall Jazz Band came out to talk about their latest Cuban-inspired album, So It Is, and perform material for the intimate crowd gathered at Apogee Studio—formerly the private recording studio for the iconic producer and mixer Bob Clearwater. As an Apogee Session, Preservation Hall Jazz Band performed to a small audience of less than 200 people within the recording studio, treating them to tastes of their new album along with spirited renditions of their older numbers that come straight out of the heart of New Orleans.Preservation Hall Jazz Band And Jon Batiste Team Up For Joyful New Orleans Performance [Photos]After a little under an hour of live performances, including of songs “La Malanga,” “Convergence,” and “Santiago,” host of the show Garth Trinidad takes over and leads members of the band in a question-and-answer session, which features a lot of information about the band’s recent time in Cuba and its influence on both the individual members of the renowned group and on the sound of their latest album, So It Is, which was announced earlier in the year in February and formally released toward the end of April.Preservation Hall Jazz Band Announces New Album, Shares First Track [Listen]The episode was aired on public radio earlier in the week, while the full video of performance was recently released on KCRW’s website. You can watch the full hour-long performance here, or watch selected clips from their performance below, courtesy of NPR Music.“La Malanga”“Convergence”“Santiago”last_img read more

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LCD Soundsystem Shares Standalone Single Ahead Of Tomorrow’s Album Release

March 2, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: mtxrtiwaj.

first_imgAmerican Dream Tracklist:01. oh baby02. other voices03. i used to04. change yr mind05. how do you sleep?06. tonite07. call the police08. american dream09. emotional haircut10. black screenYou can see a full list of LCD fall dates below:09/08 – Copenhagen, DK @ Vega09/09 – Copenhagen, DK @ Vega09/11 – Amsterdam, NL @ Paradiso09/12 – Amsterdam, NL @ Paradiso09/13 – Paris, FR @ L’Olympia09/14 – Paris, FR @ L’Olympia09/16 – Manchester, UK @ The Warehouse Project09/17 – Manchester, UK @ The Warehouse Project09/19 – Glasgow, UK @ Barrowland Ballroom09/22 – London, UK @ Alexandra Place10/17-18 – Washington, DC @ The Anthem*10/21 – Atlanta, GA @ Roxy Theatre10/22 – Atlanta, GA @ Roxy Theatre10/25 – Miami, FL @ James L. Knight Center Theater10/27 – New Orleans, LA @ Voodoo Music Experience10/30 – Dallas, TX @ The Bomb Factory10/31 – Austin, TX @ Austin360 Amphitheater11/03 – Detroit, MO @ Masonic Temple11/09 – St. Paul, MN @ Roy Wilkins Auditorium11/11 – Broomfield, CO @ 1st Bank Center11/14-15 – San Francisco, CA @ Bill Graham Civic Auditorium*11/17 – Los Angeles, CA @ Hollywood Palladium11/18 – Los Angeles, CA @ Hollywood Palladium11/19 – Los Angeles, CA @ Hollywood Palladium11/20 – Los Angeles, CA @ Hollywood Palladium11/21 – Los Angeles, CA @ Hollywood Palladium12/02 – Montreal, @ QC @ Bell Arena12/03 – Toronto, ON @ Air Canada Centre12/05-6 – Philadelphia, PA @ The Fillmore*12/06 – Philadelphia, PA @ The Fillmore12/08 – Boston, MA @ Agganis Arena12/11 – Brooklyn, NY @ Brooklyn Steel12/12 – Brooklyn, NY @ Brooklyn Steel12/14 – Brooklyn, NY @ Brooklyn Steel12/15 – Brooklyn, NY @ Brooklyn Steel12/17 – Brooklyn, NY @ Brooklyn Steel12/18 – Brooklyn, NY @ Brooklyn Steel12/19 – Brooklyn, NY @ Brooklyn Steel12/21 – Brooklyn, NY @ Brooklyn Steel12/22 – Brooklyn, NY @ Brooklyn Steel12/23 – Brooklyn, NY @ Brooklyn Steel,American Dream Tracklist:01. oh baby02. other voices03. i used to04. change yr mind05. how do you sleep?06. tonite07. call the police08. american dream09. emotional haircut10. black screenYou can see a full list of LCD fall dates below:09/08 – Copenhagen, DK @ Vega09/09 – Copenhagen, DK @ Vega09/11 – Amsterdam, NL @ Paradiso09/12 – Amsterdam, NL @ Paradiso09/13 – Paris, FR @ L’Olympia09/14 – Paris, FR @ L’Olympia09/16 – Manchester, UK @ The Warehouse Project09/17 – Manchester, UK @ The Warehouse Project09/19 – Glasgow, UK @ Barrowland Ballroom09/22 – London, UK @ Alexandra Place10/17-18 – Washington, DC @ The Anthem*10/21 – Atlanta, GA @ Roxy Theatre10/22 – Atlanta, GA @ Roxy Theatre10/25 – Miami, FL @ James L. Knight Center Theater10/27 – New Orleans, LA @ Voodoo Music Experience10/30 – Dallas, TX @ The Bomb Factory10/31 – Austin, TX @ Austin360 Amphitheater11/03 – Detroit, MO @ Masonic Temple11/09 – St. Paul, MN @ Roy Wilkins Auditorium11/11 – Broomfield, CO @ 1st Bank Center11/14-15 – San Francisco, CA @ Bill Graham Civic Auditorium*11/17 – Los Angeles, CA @ Hollywood Palladium11/18 – Los Angeles, CA @ Hollywood Palladium11/19 – Los Angeles, CA @ Hollywood Palladium11/20 – Los Angeles, CA @ Hollywood Palladium11/21 – Los Angeles, CA @ Hollywood Palladium12/02 – Montreal, @ QC @ Bell Arena12/03 – Toronto, ON @ Air Canada Centre12/05-6 – Philadelphia, PA @ The Fillmore*12/06 – Philadelphia, PA @ The Fillmore12/08 – Boston, MA @ Agganis Arena12/11 – Brooklyn, NY @ Brooklyn Steel12/12 – Brooklyn, NY @ Brooklyn Steel12/14 – Brooklyn, NY @ Brooklyn Steel12/15 – Brooklyn, NY @ Brooklyn Steel12/17 – Brooklyn, NY @ Brooklyn Steel12/18 – Brooklyn, NY @ Brooklyn Steel12/19 – Brooklyn, NY @ Brooklyn Steel12/21 – Brooklyn, NY @ Brooklyn Steel12/22 – Brooklyn, NY @ Brooklyn Steel12/23 – Brooklyn, NY @ Brooklyn Steel It took a long time, but LCD Soundsystem is officially on track to release their fourth studio record. American Dream will be released tomorrow, September 1st, via DFA/Columbia Records, marking their first new studio release since 2010’s This Is Happening. The record will include the previously released singles “call the police,” title track “american dream,” and “tonight.” Today, the Brooklyn-based band has shared a new track “pulse (v.1),” which is unlisted as part of American Dream‘s track list but is likely to appear on a separate edition of the record, assuming from the track’s artwork. The “v.1” suggests there will be more versions of this song to come.The 13+ minute track is an electronic instrumental that will hold your excitement over until the new album drops tomorrow. Listen to  “pulse (v.1)” below:last_img read more

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JRAD Debuts Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, The Band Covers At Brooklyn Bowl Finale [Videos]

March 2, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: mtxrtiwaj.

first_imgJoe Russo’s Almost Dead wrapped up their three-night run at the Brooklyn Bowl on Saturday night, delivering yet another stand-out evening of Grateful Dead music that was nowhere near short of surprises. With multiple debut covers, endless teases, and sublime jamming, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead once again proved why they’re more than just a “cover band”.Right off the bat, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead opened the first set with a debut cover of The Rolling Stones‘ “The Last Time”, with Scott Metzger on vocals. The jam led straight into an appropriate “Shakedown Street”, which featured teases of Radiohead‘s “Myxomatosis” and was left unfinished. Immediately from there, the Radiohead teases continued on “The Other One”, which also teased “Estimated Prophet”. As the band’s manager Peter Costello notes in the Box Score, this show had “a lot of ins and outs”, as the Grateful Dead-inspired quintet muscled their chops through to the finish line. Watch the first set opener below, courtesy of nugs.tv.[Video: Nugs.tv]The seamless jams continued from “The Other One” to “Mission in the Rain”, which had not been played by JRAD since the band’s 3/17/17 show at the same venue, a 41 show gap. “Crazy Fingers” came next with a stand-out jam between keyboardist Marco Benevento and guitarist Tom Hamilton. The band utilized the notes of a quick “Last Time” instrumental jam to bridge the gap between “Crazy Fingers” and “Truckin’”, before closing the first set with a short instrumental jam of “The Other One”, a trick not utilized by JRAD since their 3/11/17 show at the same venue, a 43 show gap.After their break, the second set opened with a “Scarlet Begonias”-esque jam, which led into a short instrumental version of “Slipknot!”, before locking into the debut performance of “Foolish Heart”, sung by Tom Hamilton. “I Need A Miracle” came next, with unfamiliar teases coming from Hamilton, as well as a jam through WOLF‘s “Fastso’s Last Stand”. Watch the second set opener below.[Video: Nugs.tv]An energetic “Franklin’s Tower” followed, with full-band teases of “Foolish Heart” and “Throwing Stones”. Eventually, the song shifted into a full version of “Throwing Stones”, which thematically teased back “Franklin’s Tower” and “Foolish Heart”. The debut of Led Zeppelin‘s “Good Times Bad Times” came next as a full instrumental, before segueing back into “Throwing Stones”. Another debut followed, with a partial version of The Band‘s “Chest Fever”, as sung by drummer Joe Russo with some help from Tom Hamilton. Naturally, the second set concluded with a “Throwing Stones” reprise.The evening came to a definitive end with a reliable “One More Saturday Night” to close Joe Russo’s Almost Dead’s three-night run at the Brooklyn Bowl. Next up, the band heads to Syracuse’s Landmark Theatre and Portland’s State Theatre. Head to the band’s website for more information on upcoming shows.Watch more videos from last night below, courtesy of Moni Hampton.The Last Time / Shakedown StreetMission in the RainTruckinSlipknotFoolish HeartThrowing StonesSetlist: Joe Russo’s Almost Dead | Brooklyn Bowl | New York, NY | 3/10/2018 Set One: The Last Time @ > Shakedown Street # -> The Other One -> Mission In The Rain % -> Crazy Fingers ^ -> Last Time Jam & -> Truckin’ -> The Other One Jam *Set Two: Jam + -> Slipknot! @@ -> Foolish Heart ## -> Help On The Way -> Slipknot! $$ -> I Need A Miracle %% -> Franklin’s Tower ^^ -> Throwing Stones && -> Good Times Bad Times ** -> Throwing Stones -> Chest Fever ++ -> Throwing Stones RepriseENC: One More Saturday [email protected] – Rolling Stones Cover, First Time Played By Almost Dead, Sung by SM# – Unfinished, With “Myxomatosis” (Radiohead) Teases (Band)$ – With Myxomatosis” (Radiohead) Teases (Band) and an Estimated Prophet Tease (Band)% – Not Played by Almost Dead since 2017-03-17 Brooklyn Bowl, Brooklyn, NY, a gap of 41 shows.^ – With a MB/TH duo Jam& – Short Instrumental version to connect Crazy Fingers to Trucking, First Time Played By Almost Dead* – Short Instrumental version to end Truckin, Not Played by Almost Dead since 2017-03-11 Brooklyn Bowl, Brooklyn, NY, a gap of 43 shows.+ – With a Scarlet Begonias Tease (Band)@@ – Short Instrumental version to connect Jam to Foolish Heart## – First Time Played By Almost Dead, Sung by TH$$ – with a short Marco Solo, more “Myxomatosis” (Radiohead) Teases (Band), a DD Bass Solo and a “Havana” (Camila Cabello) jam%% – With an Unknown Tease (TH) and a “Fastso’s Last Stand” (WOLF) Jam,^^ – With Foolish Heart Teases (Band) and Throwing Stones Teases (Band)&& – With a Franklin’s Tower Jam and Foolish Heart Teases (Band)** – Led Zeppelin Cover, First Time Played by Almost Dead, done Bustle Style (instrumentally) with no lyrics song++ – The Band Cover, Partial version – 1st & 2nd verse I think & 2 refrains, First Time Played by Almost Dead, sung by JR, with some help from THThe whole show had numerous teases, jams & quick returns to Myxomatosis, Foolish Heart, Slipknot!, The Other One, Terrapin, Throwing Stones and probably a ton of other tunes I missed.last_img read more

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