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Finding a shared future

January 26, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: ekyaaglzf.

first_imgSouth Bend Mayor Stephen Luecke clearly recalls meeting with University President Emeritus Fr. Edward “Monk” Malloy on campus about 15 years ago when he first stepped into the role of mayor of South Bend. It was the first of many meetings between Luecke and University officials that would define a decade and a half of collaborations on projects such as Innovation Park and Eddy Street Commons. It was the new mayor’s first access to a relationship with Notre Dame that would be sometimes challenging and often rewarding. “There were some bumps in the road from time to time,” Luecke said, specifically noting debate about whether to pass an ordinance to ban off-campus student parties in 2007. “But that provided some other opportunities for discussion that led to positive relations and finding ways to work through issues and understand different points of view.” Luecke, who has been mayor of South Bend since 1997, announced in December that he would not run for reelection next year. He is the longest-serving mayor in South Bend’s history. The mayor has led South Bend through inaugurations of two University presidents, two presidential visits to Notre Dame — Barack Obama in 2009 and George W. Bush in 2001 — and numerous debates over the years about the town-gown relationship. Luecke’s 14th-floor office in the County-City Building offers a sweeping view of the city, with the tower of Le Mans Hall at Saint Mary’s just visible to the north. He doesn’t interact with University officials on a daily basis, but collaboration is frequent, Luecke said in an interview in his downtown South Bend office. “Over the years, the relationship has strengthened and developed,” he said. With a change of city leadership coming, the University will be closely watching coming elections, said Tim Sexton, Notre Dame’s assistant vice president for Public Affairs. “The primary election, scheduled for May 3, will be very interesting,” said Sexton, who acts as the University’s point person for communication with the city. Several joint ventures, such as work with the Robinson Community Learning Center, Innovation Park and the Northeast Neighborhood Revitalization Organization, give the University reason to quickly begin a relationship with the incoming mayor, Sexton said. “There will be a learning curve, regardless of who is elected mayor, there are simply too many exciting projects and initiatives occurring for a person to wrap their hands around everything,” he said. Luecke said research facilities Innovation Park and Ignition Park stand out as one of the most prominent projects he has tackled as mayor. The University and the city first started collaborating in 2004 on the research parks to bring business to the local economy. Innovation Park is funded by multiple sources, including federal, state and local governments, the University and private donors. The Park, which opened in the fall of 2009, offers office and lab space for research ventures and start-up companies. Sexton said it is currently about 60 to 65 percent occupied with 30 tenants. Companies that develop successfully in Innovation Park can move to Ignition Park, the city’s partner research facility. Luecke recently announced that a company based in Innovation Park will graduate to Ignition Park. “We know that we won’t capture every company that succeeds and grows from Innovation Park, but if we get a few, that’s great,” Luecke said. “It is certainly our goal to capture as many companies as possible.” Luecke also notably worked with the University on building Eddy Street Commons — a project that initially sparked fears in some about Notre Dame expansion into the Northeast Neighborhood. “There were certainly some tensions at times, and worries by some neighbors that the University is expanding and going to eat up neighborhood,” Luecke said. After conversations among city officials, the University and neighborhood residents about the scope of the Commons, the city and University moved forward on developing the center of restaurants, retail and apartment complexes, which opened in 2009. The University also partnered with the city, the South Bend Clinic, Memorial Hospital of South Bend and Saint Joseph’s Regional Medical Center in the Northeast Neighborhood Revitalization Organization (NNRO) to further develop the Northeast Neighborhood, just south of Notre Dame’s campus. The NNRO works to rehabilitate homes in the neighborhood. Many house Notre Dame faculty, and about 30 percent are subsidized for moderate-income families, Luecke said. “I think that worked well in terms of satisfying some concerns resident had,” Luecke said. After 15 years, Luecke said he is ready to step down from his role. “I couldn’t really commit the energy to it for another four years,” Luecke said. “As much as I love the job, it’s a draining job.” He hasn’t yet decided what to do after he finishes his last term as mayor of South Bend, but without a campaign to split his focus, he hopes to spend the rest of his time finishing several initiatives and preparing the office for new leadership. “It’s exciting, but a little anxiety producing,” Luecke said. Governing a city that houses a major university was educational, he said. “There are challenges associated with having strong university presence,” he said, “like the town gown relationships, developing partnerships, finding common ground as university and a community. “But I think we did a great job of finding a shared future vision.”last_img read more

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SMC raises awareness for disorders

January 26, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: yzhnxslpc.

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s chapter of the National Student Speech Language Hearing Association (NSSHLA) hosted an event highlighting the professions available to students interested in communicative disorders Sunday. Current Saint Mary’s students and high school seniors from the South Bend community attended the free event to learn more about the professions and collect more information about the communicative disorders major at Saint Mary’s. The event featured student speakers, tours of the pathology and audiology labs at Saint Mary’s and a discussion panel with current speech and language pathologists and audiologists from the community. Senior Elizabeth Downs, vice president of the Saint Mary’s NSSHLA chapter, organized the event and spoke to prospective students. “We think it’s very important to promote our major because not many people know what we do,” she said. “It’s a great profession to go into, especially if you enjoy helping others. I fell in love with the intro class I took and I am really happy with my decision [to be a communicative disorders major].” Senior Lori LeClere, president of the Saint Mary’s NSSHLA chapter, said advertising the important need for communicative disorders majors was a goal of Sunday’s event. “We hope students learn about the career path — what they can do, where they can do it,” she said. “We want them to get an inside view of what speech pathology and audiology are. I came to Saint Mary’s without knowledge of the profession, so we feel it is necessary to educate others about what we do.” Downs and LeClere agreed that knowledge and awareness of professions in communicative disorders are crucial to getting more students interested in being involved. Some current communicative disorders majors were unaware that the major even existed before starting at Saint Mary’s. “I came to Saint Mary’s as a biology major,” junior Maria Malm said. “I had a general interest in helping others, and when I took the Intro to Communicative Disorders class and did my observation of others, I discovered I really enjoyed helping others. I decided to switch majors.” Malm said she hoped the NSSHLA event on Sunday stimulated more interest in the communicative disorders major, as the need for qualified therapists, pathologists and audiologists continues to rise. “Communication is essential to having high quality of life,” she said. “There is a great need for speech pathology to help others communicate their needs and wants. I look forward to helping others and getting a hands on feel for giving a voice to those with communicative disorders.”last_img read more

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Police alert ND campus of assault

January 26, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: lprxfsblu.

first_imgNotre Dame Security Police (NDSP) alerted students in an email Saturday night of a reported sexual assault that occurred in the early morning hours of March 3. NDSP is investigating the reported incident. Police said the reported assault was committed by a non-stranger in a residence hall. They advised students to be conscious of the environment they are in and look out for friends to reduce the risk of sexual assault. “College students are more likely to be assaulted by an acquaintance than a stranger.  This means that the person perpetrating the assault could be part of the campus community. Being aware of your own safety and watching out for your friends are important steps you can take to reduce the risk of sexual assault,” the email stated.last_img

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Dining halls aim to reduce food waste

January 26, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: nexmcumgj.

first_imgIf you’re reading this while eating a meal at North or South Dining Hall, stop for a moment and check your plate. How many ounces of food are on it? And how many ounces will still be on it when you place your tray on one of the tray returns? Waste Free Wednesdays, a semi-annual campaign to decrease food waste sponsored by the Office of Sustainability, Food Services and greeND, was started in the hopes that the answer to the latter question will shrink each time a student leaves the dining hall. “Our overall goal is to reduce waste,” campaign co-chair Anna Gorman said. “Basically we want to get it as small as possible. Ideally it would be zero but that’s obviously not plausible.” For one month each semester, volunteers stand at the dining hall tray returns each Wednesday between 6 p.m. and 7 p.m. If a student walks up with no leftover food on his or her tray, the individual is given a raffle ticket. Each campaign, one winner from the pool of raffle tickets is selected to win $100 in flex points. “There are certain things we don’t count as waste, such as banana peels or chicken bones,” Gorman said. “But others, like even egg whites, do count as waste.” “Waste weigh-ins,” to ascertain the average amount of food a student wastes, occur once during the week before the campaign begins as well as after it ends, Gorman said, in order to judge the effectiveness of the project. “I think people do make an extra concentrated effort [during the campaign],” she said. “It’s not necessarily as lasting as I think we’re aiming for just in terms of how they bring it into when they’re not eating at the dining hall or things like that … But it definitely has a little bit of a following that knows what it is and is glad to reduce waste.” Waste Free Wednesdays began in the fall of 2010 after research showed the large amounts of food being thrown away by students in the dining halls, Gorman said. In the fall of 2011, Food Services took the campaign one step further when it shrunk the size of the dining hall trays. “When the trays were replaced, that was also part of the campaign to stop waste,” Gorman said. “Before the trays [were shrunk], 4.64 ounces per person was the average waste from both dining halls. After, it went to 4.22 ounces.” Gorman said Notre Dame ought to become more conscious of the amount of food it wastes as a Catholic university. “I think it’s about one in six Americans struggle with hunger, and we as a University waste a total of about 1.2 tons of food each day,” she said. “It’s just something that hit home for me, and I think it’s more relevant to people than they realize.” For students to participate in the effort to decrease Notre Dame’s food waste, they simply need to think for a second before they place an item on their dining hall trays, Gorman said. “It’s mainly just being conscious of what you’re picking up,” she said. “It’s all about making a conscious effort to reduce waste.”last_img read more

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SMC Dance Company interprets artwork

January 26, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: yzhnxslpc.

first_imgMembers of the Saint Mary’s Dance Company interpreted paintings through dance in the Moreau Center for the Arts on Friday. Senior Bethany Tabor choreographed two dances in response to “Wall to Wall,” a piece by Ann Tarantino on display in the gallery. Tabor, junior Taylor Couillard-Rodak, sophomore Jing Zhu, senior Catherine Cislo and senior Alysha Zemanek performed the work. “I think I’d title it ‘Contact,’” Tabor said. “The way the dance moved – it’s sort of formally the same as the paintings on the wall.” Tabor, an art history and philosophy major, said she designed the compositions with Tarantino’s “lonely figures in unknown landscapes” in mind. The black fireworks of paint Tarantino applied directly on the gallery walls compelled Tabor, also a dance minor, to turn the work she has been doing for her senior composition into a hands-on experience, she said. “I am writing my senior comp on dance in the art space,” Tabor said. “A recent trend in art galleries is to have dance companies come in and dance among the art work. It’s a new phenomenon in art right now, and I’m researching that.” Tabor said her advisor, art professor Tiffany Bidler, believed Tarantino’s paintings could potentially enhance Tabor’s project. “We’re all part of the Saint Mary’s Dance Company, and we’re dancing in a piece together for the show in February, and this is loosely based off of what we’ve done in rehearsals for that,” Tabor said. Senior Katie Haemmerle said she enjoyed the piece because it portrayed themes that appeal to her particular aesthetic preferences. “The artist, on her description, said that it was meant to convey sort of loneliness isolation and then sea life,” Haemmerle said. “I’m usually drawn to literature, art, poetry, anything with that sort of thing, so I liked it in that sense.” Beyond the emotional connotations, Haemmerle said she believes dance itself offers an unusual medium to communicate ideas. “A lot of people will perceive art as being something stationary on the wall,” Haemmerle said. “I think this is a good way to express that art and dance can be combined and integrated to form something that is not just on the wall. It provides movement to something stationary.” Haemmerle said she felt the movement of the dancers reflected the intended movement of Tarantino’s paintings. “I don’t know if I’m interpreting the dance correctly, but the way the dancers formed the cluster and then spread out – I thought that was a good way to represent what’s on the wall with the paintings and how they’re spread out,” Haemmerle said. “They created white space with movement, which is interesting In fiction, but more so in poetry, white space has purpose. I feel like if you look at the wall, it does the same thing. It creates that isolation, and the dance I thought expressed the exact same thing.” Contact Rebecca O’Neil at [email protected]last_img read more

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Lecturer promotes revised campus dating culture

January 26, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: ixyfmqzbo.

first_imgFor the second installment of the Theology on Tap series, Bree Haler, assistant director of evangelization for the Office of Campus Ministry, talked about the “lost art of dating” at Legends on Wednesday night.Although she said she has only worked at Notre Dame for a semester, that time has allowed her to make some observations on the way people romantically relate to one another on campus. She said dating, or a lack thereof, tends to hold three separate forms: pseudo-marriage, hooking up and opting out.The pseudo-married couples are the people who always seem to be together, she said. Their relationship seems to exist in a vacuum, or they lack meaningful relationships outside of the emotional intimacy they share together.The hook-up culture, on the contrary, lacks any emotional intimacy, Haler said.“It involves physical intimacy where emotional intimacy does not exist, and I think it’s a purposefully vague word,” she said.Haler said some people “opt out” of dating by staying busy, pursuing academics, working and volunteering.“Hooking up doesn’t really speak to our nature, for what we’re created for, for what our hearts really desire,” she said. “Pseudo-marriage in a vacuum is kind of just as isolating as hooking up and opting out. Opting out kind of just forfeits both kinds of intimacy and says, ‘I’m not really going to try because I don’t believe what I want and desire exist.’”The reality is that we are created for more than these extreme styles of relationships, Haler said.“Many people are just really confused about the meaning of love and the purpose of sex,” she said. “I think many of us are searching for the meaning of life and love, but we don’t realize that the answer is actually right in front of us.“I think the key to finding that love is really hidden in God’s original design for our bodies and our souls. God is actually hidden in our design as males and females, a key and secret to love. The point in sharing it is that our desire to be in relationship with others is in our nature.”Haler said hook-up culture distorts this and makes people feel bad for wanting more than a meaningless hook up. Today’s society even expects the Church to bend to the moral laxity of secular culture or to soften its moral doctrine, she said.“The Church’s teaching on sexuality is not in place for enforcing rules or control over us, and I don’t think it’s meant to come from this place of rigidity or to keep us unhappy,” Haler said. “I think the Church’s teaching on sexuality is not meant to confine us but to really liberate us to love others and to give us the capacity to give of ourselves freely in the way that we were designed to do.”Haler said utilitarianism is a key issue in society today, and relates to the dating scene as well. She said people pursue comfort, advantage and benefit because they want whatever maximizes pleasure and minimizes pain.“Utilitarianism is so much a part of our modern world that many people today, even good meaning and well-intentioned Christians, may approach relationships in terms of how useful a person is in helping me achieve my goals,” she said.This is neither a way of existing or loving, Haler said. To combat this problem, she proposed dating.“Our hook-up culture makes it seem like it’s impossible to date and expressing interest in somebody and then asking them out is like a marriage proposal,” she said. “We take it so seriously and it’s so ripe with anxiety that we just avoid it.“[But] the more we get to know people we’re interested in, the more we realize the type of person we want to be with in relationship exists. If we date more, the breadth of our experience alone allows us to discover what we’re really looking for and what it is that we need in a companion to be compatible.”Her rule is to ask somebody out and to do it in person, Haler said.“We are a Facebook, Snapchat, text message generation, so most of our communication is not in person,” she said. “But if we cannot risk vulnerability in asking somebody out and putting ourselves out there face to face, then we never lay the foundation for communication in a relationship.”In addition to her rule, Haler recommended three phases to the dating process. She said phase one involves dates one through three, and date one must be a “phase one” date.“No alcohol. You have to be able to speak soberly,” she said. “And no physical interaction. Also, if you ask, you pay. If the girls are asking, the girls are paying. It’s considerate, and it shows that you care to then pay for the date.’Gathering information, revealing interesting traits and showing interest in the other all within the time cap of an hour and a half are incorporated in phase one, Haler said. Phase two involves dates four and onward.“What you’re doing here is really getting to know this person better, revealing things about yourself,” she said. “Phase two dating is exclusive. In phase two dating, everyone is still responsible for their own feelings. No one is bearing the burden of anyone else’s heart yet.”Finally, phase three dating involves the “define the relationship” (DTR) talk, she said, and finally, the relationship.“The more we put ourselves out there, the more we realize that what we want and what we desire in relationship — it exists,” Haler said.Tags: Dating, Theology on Taplast_img read more

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SMC prepares all-female ‘Henry V’ performance

January 26, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: fofabvlic.

first_imgWhen audiences first see director Mark Abram-Copenhaver’s spring production of “Henry V” at Saint Mary’s, they might be surprised at the lack of male actors.The play, which takes place April 3-6, is the first of its kind to premiere at Saint Mary’s. Every role from the servants to the king herself is portrayed and brought to life by an all-female ensemble at O’Laughlin Auditorium, sophomore cast member Claire Bleecker said.Abram-Copenhaver is the visionary behind the unusual concept of an all-female production of this Shakespearean history. By cutting and rearranging the text, he hopes to open its context for creative and thematic interpretation, Bleecker said.Bleecker said she is excited to say she is part of an all-female production of a Shakespeare play, especially one so fueled by masculinity.“There are three or four actual girl parts, so this is a play that I would never get a chance to be in outside of Saint Mary’s,” Bleecker said. “Back in my hometown, I played Hermia in a ‘Midsummer Night’s Dream’ and Luciana in ‘Comedy of Errors,’ and they’re both basically the same people.  They’re not funny or tragic, they’re just objects of love for the people in the play.”Bleecker said although she has a rather small part, playing the character of Bardolph, she thinks the male role will be a great experience for her.“[Bardolph is] complex and has actual characteristics, whereas the female parts that I played in the past really don’t have actual characteristics,” Bleecker said.Critics of Shakespeare often point out that the major flaws in the female characters are their lack of depth and layers, Bleecker said.“When women are put into sticky situations in Shakespeare plays, their narrative is gone about in this light, sort of funny way,” she said.  “There’s this dichotomy where the women are light and the men are taken very seriously.”In addition to playing with the script, Abram-Copenhaver has brought in various speakers to better inform the cast about what they are saying and performing, Bleecker said.Professor of Shakespeare studies Christopher Cobb recently assisted the ensemble in understanding the historical background of the play’s time frame and setting, Bleecker said.The cast also consists of women who are not Saint Mary’s students, Bleecker said.“We have one of the employees of the College … one of the ladies who works in the Husking Center … [and] a math teacher who graduated from Saint Mary’s,” she said. “It’s a good range from freshmen to seniors.”One significant character trait Abram-Copenhaver wants each of his actresses to focus on in their performances is that they are not women playing men but women playing women, Bleecker said.“Essentially our characters are the same as men, as in we’re not just purely comical or love objects,” she said. “We’re tragic and sad and funny and everything else too. [Mark] says, ‘You’re not playing men. You’re playing women. You’re women playing these characters.’“That re-enforces the fact that we can play men [and] women can play complex characters. We’re not going to pretend to be men, because we can’t fool anyone there. It’s a major interpretation decision that he made and I agree with,” she said.In performing in an all-female “Henry V” Bleecker said she feels there is a need for this interpretation of a classic play to showcase the strength women can bring to such a story.“In history, we as women look back and men have always ruled,” she said.“Men were always the leaders, always, always, always, always. But now we’re at a time in history where we have an all-women’s cast in a show.“Here’s a real example of a time when women are making the decisions and acting all the parts and being complex and beautiful.  A little girl in the audience seeing King Henry? Yes, that’s going to have an impact. This is a ‘her’ story of King Henry V.”Tags: all-female, Emilie, Emilie Kefalas, henry v, Kefalas, performance, Play, production, Shakespeare, SMC, Theater, theater departmentlast_img read more

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Schuster/Moorhead win election

January 26, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: ixyfmqzbo.

first_imgPhoto Courtesy of McKenna Schuster Incoming student body president McKenna Schuster (right) and vice president Sam Moorhead (left) will take office April 1.Schuster said the duo’s goals for the upcoming year can be encapsulated by three words: communication, involvement and sisterhood.“That’s the bottom line of our platform, and it pretty much summarizes what we want to emphasize throughout the year,” she said. “Our major points are firstly transparency between the student government and the student body, along with better communication amongst all members of SGA.”Next, she hopes to inspire more students to be more involved in clubs, sporting events and other campus activities that apply to the student body as a whole and tie together the sisterhood of the College.“There are so many opportunities at Saint Mary’s, and by encouraging students to attend new things, more women can come to know how great Saint Mary’s really is,” Schuster said.The pair also said they would like to plan special events during first-year orientation, for that is where students’ love for Saint Mary’s first begins.“We aren’t just working for our senior year, but for the whole student body for years to come,” Schuster said. Moorhead, who will serve as the upcoming student body vice president, said she has been involved in SGA for the past couple of years and is looking forward to having a bigger leadership responsibility.“I have gotten to see how the systems work,” Moorhead said.  “I think I’m most excited to start working on our new ideas and deciding what will be the best structure for SGA in the future, and to then implement these great ideas and work to improve the system that already exists.“I think McKenna and I will make great contributions, and we can’t wait to get to know everyone on campus a little better.”Current student body president Kat Sullivan said both Schuster and Moorhead know what needs to be improved in campus life and in student government as a whole.“They have good heads on their shoulders and are very articulate, and they see the importance of giving students a voice,” Sullivan said.  “I am excited to see how they apply that to their administration.”Sullivan said her and current vice president Maddy Martin’s three main goals of communication, transparency and building community will also be at the core of Schuster and Moorhead’s administration.“Maddy and I always thought building the community was most important, not only in our student government board but also in Saint Mary’s as a whole,” Sullivan said.  “I think [Schuster and Moorhead] understand this, too.“Moorhead did a great job organizing Love Your Body Week this year, with so much student participation in all of the events.  I’m really excited to see how they increase that sense of community next year.”Martin said by working with both Schuster and Moorhead in SGA in the past, she knows they are extremely determined young ladies.“I’m excited to see how they continue to develop student government, in particular the senate,” Martin said. “I hope that they continue to strive to make Saint Mary’s a proactive presence in the greater South Bend community.”Vice president of student affairs Karen Johnson said she is proud of the students for taking the elections so seriously and knows the new leadership will do an excellent job.Tags: moorhead, schuster, sga, sga elections, sga student government elections, SMC, SMC Elections, vp and president The results of the Saint Mary’s Student Government Association (SGA) election for student body president and vice president were announced Tuesday morning after an all-day voting period Monday on OrgSync.Juniors McKenna Schuster and Sam Moorhead won the election over juniors Nicole O’Toole and Marissa Pie’, director of student involvement Stephanie Steward-Bridges announced in a schoolwide email.Steward-Bridges said more than 500 votes were cast in this election, tripling last year’s voter participation.Schuster, who will serve as student body president, said she received the news via text from running partner Moorhead before giving a presentation in class.“I was so excited,” Schuster said. “I called my parents right away. I am looking forward to the upcoming year, [because I have been] hearing more and more great ideas from people that make me look forward to actually be able to do something about them.“I can’t wait to get the ball rolling.”last_img read more

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O’SNAP promotes safe transportation

January 26, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: idcoqljmx.

first_imgFor one of the term’s first major policy initiatives, student body president Lauren Vidal and vice president Matthew Devine, both seniors, set out to augment late night student transportation on campus with the Student Nighttime Auxiliary Patrol (O’SNAP).O’SNAP allows Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) student employees to use two Global Electric Motor (GEM) cars to give students rides at night, NDSP sergeant Tracy Skibins said. Two NDSP golf carts supplement the service if both cars are in use.O’SNAP runs Sunday through Wednesday from 8:30 p.m. to 2:30 a.m, and on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, it runs from 9 p.m.  to 3 a.m, Skibins said.Vidal said O’SNAP came to fruition after discussing campus safety and looking for tangible ways to positively impact the student experience through a necessary safety initiative.“We conducted research, worked with NDSP and ND Transportation to determine the best vehicles for the new service,” Vidal said. “Thus far, it has been a very positive initiative, but overall we will continue to build upon the program to tailor it to Notre Dame’s current climate.”Skibins said the service averaged approximately 650 rides per month during October and September.“In the month of November, O’SNAP recorded over 1,000 riders in only one month,” Vidal said.Students can receive rides from O’SNAP by calling NDSP or going to the substation in the lower level of LaFortune Student Center, Skibins said.“Students who are in LaFortune can go up to the student employee and request a ride that way, if they don’t want to call on the phone,” she said. “[The student employee] also offers safety tips, information on how to register property and all the different resources available to them through NDSP. That’s brand new, too, and it’s tied in with the O’SNAP program.”Skibins said the O’SNAP service fits NDSP’s larger mission to promote student safety, and NDSP still offers assistance when the program is not operating.“Let’s say its 3:30 a.m. and the service is no longer operating, or its 8 p.m. and the service has not started yet — we won’t turn anyone away if you call NDSP,” Skibins said. “We will simply dispatch one of our officers to assist.“NDSP is thrilled to be working together with student government in offering this service to students,” she said. “NDSP and NDSP student employees realize that we are working on making this as efficient as possible and as useful as possible, and we expect improvement along the way.”Vidal said the O’SNAP service has received positive feedback so far, and her administration continues to develop services that reflect student needs.“We will be utilizing vans, provided by Notre Dame Transportation, for the heavy winter snows, so that students will still get safe, reliable and warm transportation,” she said. “The mobile app is almost completed, thanks to [the Office of Information Technologies] and NDSP’s help, and we will be launching it soon. The mobile app will have choices for pick up and drop off locations all around campus and will send a message straight to dispatchers.“O’SNAP is still being worked on, as we are always looking to make the program better, but we have seen a huge increase in ridership and students utilizing safe and reliable transportation in the evenings. This is what we set out to do, now we will work throughout the remainder of the year to make it even stronger.”Tags: Lauren Vidal, Matthew Devine, NDSP, Notre Dame Security Police, O’SNAP, Student government, Tracy Skibinslast_img read more

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Panel examines gun control laws

January 26, 2021 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: ixyfmqzbo.

first_imgSandra Froman, former president of the National Rifle Association (NRA), and Notre Dame political science associate professor Matthew Hall confronted the issue of gun control and Second Amendment interpretation in a panel discussion Tuesday afternoon. Froman said that the increased political dialogue over the Second Amendment has been hugely beneficial. “When I attended law school many years ago, we had a very thick red casebook,” Froman said. “And nowhere in the 1,400 or 1,500 pages was there any mention of the Second Amendment. Now, the authors of that casebook had the intellectual integrity to reprint the Bill of Rights in its integrity in the back, but there was no discussion of what it meant or any court cases about it. Things have changed.” While he agreed increased dialogue was positive, Hall said he took the opposite approach to interpreting the Second Amendment. “I’m going to try to convince you that when it comes to interpreting the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, we should adopt a traditional jurisprudential approach, rooted in the text, the original understanding and the Supreme Court precedent,” Hall said. There are many misconceptions surrounding gun regulations, including the availability of fully automatic firearms and gun show “loopholes,” Froman said. “It’s astonishing to me how intelligent, educated people can maintain a certain level of ignorance about the current state of firearms technology, policy, law and regulations, when the issues are so prominent in the media these days,” she said.Those misconceptions also extend to the purpose of the NRA, Froman said. “There are a lot of references to the NRA as a powerful gun lobby; what a lot of people who aren’t involved with the NRA and don’t know very much about the NRA don’t realize is that we are actually the foremost firearm safety and marksmanship training organization in the world,” she said. “That’s how we started, in 1871, that’s what we’re known for.” Hall focused more on addressing how the Second Amendment should be interpreted and said our “love affair” with guns hindered our ability to do so faithfully. “America loves guns; there’s no doubt about it,” he said. “We have almost 300 million guns in the U.S. — almost one for every man, woman and child in the United States — so when we sit down to try to read a constitutional text and apply that to gun control policy, love blinds us and sometimes, maybe we lose sight of those pesky principles like textualism and originalism.” “The Second Amendment is unique in constitutional clauses in that it explicitly tells us what its purpose is — we sometimes forget how unusual it is,” Hall said. “The First Amendment doesn’t have a preamble, telling us how important free speech is for democratic self-government. “We don’t get a little explanation of why we get most constitutional clauses and yet the framers of the Second Amendment seem to bend over backwards to write into the text the purpose of the Second Amendment: the preservation of a well-regulated militia.”Froman said the presidential election highlighted the differences between Democratic and Republican conceptions of what gun control should look like.“This recent presidential election presented a stark contrast between the Democrat candidate who openly called for registering not only firearms, but ammunition and argued for bans on commonly owned modern sporting rifles — which the media calls assault weapons — and called for a Supreme Court that would overthrow [District of Columbia v. Heller],” Froman said. District of Columbia v. Heller ruled to protect an individual’s “God-given” right to possess a firearm for lawful purposes, including self-defense.“The Republican candidate eschewed these overarching restrictions on firearms restrictions, was endorsed by the NRA and shocked the nation and embarrassed political commentators and pollsters everywhere by an unprecedented election victory,” Froman said. “The issues that have generated much controversy during the election, especially about firearms are continuing in the media today.” In his closing remarks, Hall said that given the restrictions on other rights in the constitution, gun ownership should come with stipulations.“Free speech isn’t absolute — why would gun ownership be absolute?” Hall said. On the future of gun control, Froman said she was supportive of President Donald Trump and his plans. “[Regarding] the election, there’s a new sheriff in town,” Froman said. “Whether you voted for Donald Trump or not, whether you like Donald Trump or not, he’s made it clear that he’s pro-Second Amendment.”Tags: Donald Trump, gun rights, second amendmentlast_img read more

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