Archives: 乐上海

Public Service of Dominica not politicised

September 26, 2020 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: tdruvkbqd.

first_imgLocalNews Public Service of Dominica not politicised by: – January 10, 2012 Tweet 18 Views   no discussions Share Sharing is caring!center_img Share Share Secretary to the Cabinet and Head of the Public Service, Mr. Felix Gregoire. The opening of the year 2012 is an opportune time to extend warmest New Year’s greetings to all citizens of the Commonwealth of Dominica and to thank all Government Employees for their dedication, commitment and diligence during 2011.In recent times, the perception being given in the media is that the Public Service of the Commonwealth of Dominica is politicised. This perception is totally baseless. The Public Service has served the general public with integrity and impartiality and will certainly continue to do so without fear or favour in 2012 and beyond.Section 68 of the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Dominica states: “Where any Minister has been charged with responsibility for any department of Government, he shall exercise general direction and control over that department; and, subject to such direction and control, every department of Government shall be under the supervision of a public officer whose office is referred to in this Constitution as the office of a Permanent Secretary:”. This section of the Constitution clearly describes the relationship between the Minister and the Permanent Secretary, which demands that in the management of a Department or Ministry the Minister and Permanent Secretary must work together in an atmosphere of mutual trust and respect. Put simply, the Minister is responsible for policy direction with the advice of the Permanent Secretary while the Permanent Secretary is responsible for the administrative aspects, which include the implementation of policy, rules and regulations.Government’s policy framework is outlined in the Growth and Social Protection Strategy (GSPS) which has been developed with the input of various stakeholders, culminating with the final approval of the Cabinet. Presently the GSPS is being revised for the second time.Given that Government’s policy is outlined in the GSPS, there should be no conflict between the Minister and Permanent Secretary in the implementation of such policy.With respect to the recruitment and promotion of public officers, this responsibility rests with the Public Service Commission. In the performance of its duties the Commission receives recommendations from Permanent Secretaries and Head of Departments, (never from Ministers). The decisions of the Commission are final except in the case of officers to be appointed under Section 86 of the Constitution which requires the Prime Minister to give a “no objection” to these appointments. This “no objection” is enshrined in Section 86 (1) of the Constitution and has been exercised by every Prime Minister since 1978.Permanent Secretaries and Head of Departments are public officers who have worked their way upwards through the various ranks within the Public Service, and have served various administrations (Governments). These officers, after completing their professional training overseas, have returned to Dominica to serve their country through thick and thin. Many of them could have landed lucrative jobs overseas, but decided to remain in Dominica to contribute to the national development.It should be noted that the few advisors engaged by the Government operate within their terms of reference and are not public officers, although they may report to a Permanent Secretary.There may not always be agreement between Ministers and Permanent Secretaries on the specific manner in which programmes are implemented, but this has been managed through the observance of public service rules and regulations, and of course the will to see progress and development in the country.Senior public officers have the discipline to separate personal opinion and agenda from professional advice and good work ethics, given the need to account to their superiors as well as set the example for subordinates and officers under their supervision.The Public Service of Dominica is an institution. Many persons have entered and left the public service and various Governments have been in and out of office. Through all these, the Public Service has remained as an institution established by the Dominica Constitution. The recent Public Service Reform Programmes have been designed mainly to increase productivity in the Public Service. These improvements have produced tremendous results at the Inland Revenue, Customs and Registry for example, while improvements will soon follow in other areas. In conclusion, there is need for the Public Service, like any other institution, to continuously examine its operations, policies and programmes to ensure achievement of targeted development objectives. Therefore, any input, feedback or suggestions that will support the valiant efforts of the Public Service in this endeavour, would be welcomed.Felix GregoireSECRETARY TO THE CABINET & HEAD OF THE PUBLIC SERVICElast_img read more

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McIlroy makes slow start

September 21, 2020 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: ercinbyyl.

first_img Starting from the 10th, the world number two missed short putts to bogey the 11th and 12th before hitting back with a birdie on the short par-four 13th. At one over par he was three off the early lead shared by English duo Mark Foster and Paul Waring, Australian Andrew Dodt and American Tyler McCumber, son of former US Tour player Mark McCumber. McIlroy won five times last year, including his second major title in the US PGA Championship at Kiawah Island, but has struggled to reproduce that form in 2013. The 24-year-old finished 41st in the US Open at Merion a fortnight ago and yesterday apologised for throwing a club and bending his nine iron out of shape during a final round of 76. The nine iron – one of the Nike clubs he controversially changed to in a multi-million pound deal in January – has since gained a new shaft, but McIlroy’s putting was more the problem as he dropped two shots in his first three holes. Rory McIlroy’s bid for a first win of the season got off to a slow start today as light rain greeted the early starters in the first round of the Irish Open.center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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Dougherty: Syracuse, more than most teams, can’t afford to fall behind

September 16, 2020 | By admin | No Comments | Filed in: fofabvlic.

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on December 15, 2015 at 7:24 pm In 10 games, Syracuse has shot the lights out and shot itself in the foot. It’s struggled to rebound against mid-major opponents then been sturdier in the paint against Power-Five frontcourts. It was a Top 25 team after the Battle 4 Atlantis and then anything but in Madison Square Garden on Sunday.And inside of its mercurial start is a big-picture problem that looks hard to fix. One that, uncharacteristic of the young season, has stretched across two recent games.As Syracuse.com’s Mike Waters noted Tuesday, Syracuse has trailed by eight or more points in the first half of six of its 10 games this season. This was a key factor in the Orange’s last two losses — on the road at Georgetown and St. John’s, respectively — in which the Hoyas and Red Storm jumped out to early leads that held to the finish. And while SU shot itself out of both these games, going a combined 6-for-26 from 3 in the two second halves, there’s a more troubling trend at hand.Naturally, Syracuse’s (7-3) first-half deficits turn into second-half deficits. Georgetown built its biggest lead of the game, 21 points, with 16:12 remaining. St. John’s’, 13, came with 7:29 on the game clock. This has forced the Orange to use its most effective offensive lineup, which is smaller and does not include starting center Dajuan Coleman, down the stretch. That group is supposed to space the floor, get in transition, force turnovers with an extended 2-3 zone and, ultimately, score enough to forge a comeback.But that group also struggles mightily to defend the paint, leaving Syracuse without a late-game lineup that can both score and stop opponents.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“If we weren’t digging ourselves in deficits, maybe we could play a little bit bigger,” SU interim head coach Mike Hopkins said after the loss to the Red Storm, whose 44 second-half points were the most an Orange opponent has scored in a half this season.“But when we’re down, we have to score and our best lineup is going to be in the game.” Sam Maller | Staff PhotographerSam Maller | Staff PhotographerThe “best lineup” Hopkins is referring to pairs 6-foot-8 freshman Tyler Lydon and 6-foot-8 junior Tyler Roberson in SU’s frontcourt, with Lydon as the undersized center. Coleman played nine minutes in the second half against Georgetown and just five minutes in the second half against St. John’s. That means Lydon has played 26 minutes of center in the two second halves, which were the two best offensive frames for SU opponents this season.The high second-half outputs — 43 points for the Hoyas and 44 for the Red Storm — came after Syracuse trailed by 12 and nine points, respectively. Georgetown was fueled by 13 second-half points by 6-foot-11 center Bradley Hayes, who shot 5-of-8 from the field and 3-for-5 from the line in the last 20 minutes. St. John’s made an electric 7-of-11 3s in the second half, but that started with 6-foot-7 forward Kassoum Yakwe spacing the defense with 11 points inside the arc.Yakwe, working out of the high post, attacked Lydon and Roberson at the rim and went 3-for-7 from the field and 5-for-6 from the free-throw line. In the first half, SU played off the Red Storm’s bigs in the high post and focused on defending the perimeter. That was somewhat effective until…“… they started attacking out of there, and (Christian) Jones and Yakwe did a good job of attacking,” Hopkins said. “That’s where our size differential, with Tyler Lydon and Dajuan…”Then Hopkins ditched that thought and said Syracuse could play bigger if it weren’t playing from behind. Because if it trails in the second half in Atlantic Coast Conference play, which is now three games away, the Orange doesn’t have a lineup balanced enough to comeback against talented teams.Hell, it doesn’t currently have a lineup balanced enough to come back against a St. John’s team that lost to Fordham by 16 and beat Niagara 48-44 four days before SU visited.You can say what you want about Syracuse’s late-game shooting, because it has been bad.But the Orange’s height can’t break out of a slump. It just is what it is.Jesse Dougherty is the Web Editor at The Daily Orange, where his column appears occasionally. He can be reached at jcdoug01@syr.edu or @dougherty_jesse. Commentscenter_img Related Stories What we learned from Syracuse’s loss to St. John’sSyracuse misses too many shots in upset loss to St. John’slast_img read more

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